Sheetflow Construction Erosion and Sediment Control

April 30, 2019

Clouds over the Palouse

Filed under: Photo — Tags: , , , , , — Sheetflow @ 2:14 am

Photo: David Jenkins

April 23, 2019

On Vacation

Checking erosion in southern Utah.

Mansard Petroglyph Site
David S. Jenkins Photo

April 21, 2019

On Vacation

Checking erosion in southern Utah.

Zion National Park
David S. Jenkins Photo

April 19, 2019

On Vacation

Filed under: Photo — Tags: , , , — Sheetflow @ 3:19 am

Checking erosion in Northern Arizona.

North rim of the Grand Canyon
David S. Jenkins Photo

April 18, 2019

On Vacation

Filed under: Photo — Tags: , , , , , , , , — Sheetflow @ 3:18 am

Checking out erosion in southern Utah.

Wire Pass to Buckskin Gulch Slot Canyon
David S. Jenkins Photo

April 16, 2019

On Vacation

Filed under: Photo — Tags: , , , — Sheetflow @ 7:41 am

Checking out erosion in southern Utah.


Paria, Utah
David S. Jenkins Photo

April 9, 2019

Process Wastewater

What is process wastewater?

The definition of process wastewater and how it applies to construction has always been a bit confusing to me.  There are some construction activities that are obvious generators of process water like pressure washing, but then there seems to be some grey when it comes to filling a water truck from a hydrant and using the water for dust control. 

I suspect regulators, if you ask them, will give some conflicting definitions of construction process water.  I am going to try to work through this over a few days, or weeks or however long it takes to come up with a satisfying answer. 

First off, how do the Feds define it? Process wastewater as defined by 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 122.2. https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/40/122.2

 it says: “Process wastewater means any water which, during manufacturing or processing, comes into direct contact with or results from the production or use of any raw material, intermediate product, finished productbyproduct, or waste product.

EPA uses this definition in their NPDES Glossary. Find at https://www.epa.gov/npdes

The Washington State Department of Ecology uses that definition in the Construction Stormwater General permit and adds: “If stormwater commingles with process wastewater, the commingled water is considered process wastewater”.

This is the legal definition of process wastewater.  It is a good, solid, bit of legalese, developed by lawyers for lawyers.   Though I haven’t researched this, I think it is likely this definition originated when the Clean Water Act was in its beginning stage of development and was applied to industrial, “end of pipe” discharge facilities, like chemical plants, and manufacturers. 

Herein, I believe, lies my confusion; construction doesn’t fit this description.  I guess technically it is, or can be, an end of pipe facility, but construction is transient, has a limited duration, and generally has the potential for diffuse discharges rather than just one or two discreet discharge points.

With that, I will think some more and post some more when my headache goes away.

April 2, 2019

Migratory Bird Treaty Act Nest Removal

A little something different this week: we are going to do some demolition next to the waterfront this spring. Starting in April or May, seagulls begin nesting on buildings around the waterfront. When seagulls nest, you can’t demolish the buildings until you apply for and get permission for a “Take” of a bird covered under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. This takes time, holds up the contractor, everyone gets frustrated. In order to head this off, I wrote some contract specifications, which hopefully, will keep this from happening

NESTING BIRD WATCH AND CONTROL

  1. Owner shall provide bird watch services up until 30 days after Contract Execution, to ensure there are no nesting birds that may impact the Contractor’s ability to perform work. At 30 days after Contract Execution, the Contractor shall take over full responsibility for this work.
  2. Contractor shall be responsible for preventing migratory birds from nesting on the roofs of buildings to be demolished. 
  3. Prevention shall include, at a minimum, once daily roof inspections to determine whether migratory birds are conducting nest building activity. 
  4. Nests that do not contain eggs and that are not in the possession of migratory birds shall be destroyed.
  5. Nests that contain one or more eggs shall not be disturbed and shall be immediately reported to the Engineer.
  6. Nests that are complete and in the possession of a migratory bird, with or without eggs, shall not be disturbed and shall be immediately reported to the Engineer.
  7. All Project delays and associated costs due to nesting birds discovered after the Contractor assumes responsibility for bird watch/control shall be the full responsibility of the Contractor.

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