Sheetflow

April 30, 2015

Jean M. Jenkins – April 8, 1925 to April 27, 2015

Filed under: Article — Tags: , , , , , — Sheetflow @ 2:34 am

To the best mom ever! They said you wouldn’t live past 17, you lived to 90, outliving all of them.

War bride from Vancouver, Canada, married Cyril Jenkins in 1946, obtained her citizenship, moved to Los Angeles, raised 3 boys, moved to Bremerton to start a new life, married 55 years until Cy’s death, lost her oldest son to cancer, only finished 3rd grade leaving because of TB but was the smartest person I have known, both book smart and life smart. I love and miss you terribly and am glad you are with Cy and Steve. Bye Sweetheart.

mom boatshed closeup bw

June 1, 2014

How to Design and Install a Wheel Wash

How to Design and Install a Wheel Wash
By: Mark Kestner, Ph.D.

National Environmental Service Co., Inc.
7 Hampshire Drive, Mendham, NJ 07945 Tel: 973-543-4586 www.drdust.com
Presented at: California Mining Association Annual Meeting 2005, Squaw Valley, CA May 24-27

Introduction

Quarries, ready-mix plants, construction sites and other industrial facilities have become the
targets of new regulations designed to prevent track-out of mud, dust and dirt on to public roads. These
regulations have been developed primarily in response to Federal EPA actions that have designated many
metropolitan areas as “non-attainment” for their failure to comply with air quality standards for fine
particulate. Fine particulate, known as PM10 and fine respirable particulate, PM2.5, are now regarded as
the number one health hazard in urban environments. These particles are so small that they become
lodged in the aveoli of the lungs where they can cause or aggravate a variety of respiratory diseases
including asthma, emphysema and lung cancer.
Local governments in non-attainment areas are forced to take draconian measures to comply with
fine particulate standards or face the loss of federal highway funds. As a result, cities like Los Angeles
and Phoenix, have or are in the process of adopting rules that require affected facilities to install wheel
washes. The South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) in California, for example, has
recently passed Rule 1157 that will mandate the use of rumble grates and tire washes.
In other areas of the country, encroaching residential and commercial development around
industrial sites has led to an increased demand for wheel washes. Many companies, particularly stone
quarries, have installed wheel washes in order to get out in front of regulation and demonstrate their
willingness to be good neighbors. Other facilities are forced into compliance through fines and litigation.

Faced with state and local governments under the threat of federal action and a public unwilling
to tolerate any pollution, companies need to take a hard look at how best to respond. Because the costs of
pollution control equipment are difficult to recover, affected facilities have a real incentive to develop
affordable and effective technology to prevent carryout.
….MORE….

February 1, 2014

Polymer Use and Testing for Erosion and Sediment Control on Construction Sites

Filed under: Article — Tags: , , , , , , — Sheetflow @ 12:15 pm

January-February 2001
Erosion Control Magazine

Polymer Use and Testing for Erosion and Sediment Control on Construction Sites
By Scott Tobiason, David Jenkins, Ed Molash, Stacey Rush

Tested in the soggy La Niña weather conditions of the Pacific Northwest, chemical polymers promise a cost-effective, safe way to prevent soil erosion and remove suspended sediments from construction-site runoff.

References
Azzam, R.A.I. “Agricultural Polymers, Polyacrylamide Preparation, Application and Prospects in Soil Conditioning.” Commercial Soil Science Plant Analysis. 11:235-243. 1980.

Betz Laboratories. Material Safety Data Sheet for Betz Polymer 1190. PFW 2819101. Betz Industrial Laboratories, Macon, GA. 1995.

Bremerton Sun. “Giant Retailer Pledges to be OGood Neighbor.'” West Sound, Section B. February 3, 1996, p. 1.

Calgon Corporation. Material Safety Data Sheet for Cat-Floc 2953 Liquid Cationic Polymer. Bulletin No. 12-485. Calgon Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA. 1997.

King County. Surface Water Design Manual. King County (WA) Department of Public Works. Revised November 1994.

Minton, G. “Use of Polymer to Treat Construction Site Stormwater.” Proceedings of Conference XXX. International Erosion Control Association, Steamboat Springs, CO. February 22-26, 1999, pp. 175-188.

Roa, A. Screening of Polymers to Determine Their Potential Use on Construction Sites. Publication No. 101-96. University of Idaho, Moscow, ID. 1996, pp. 77-83.

Sojka, R.E. and R.D. Lentz. A PAM Primer: A Brief History of PAM and PAM-related Issues. Publication No. 101-96. University of Idaho, Moscow, ID. 1996, pp. 11-20.

University of Georgia. “Georgia Adopts New Turbidity Standard.” Waterwise. University of Georgia, College of Environmental Sciences, Athens, GA. January 1998.

Washington Department of Ecology. Stormwater Management Manual for the Puget Sound Basin. Publication No. 91-75. 1992.

November 3, 2013

Preparing for Fall and Winter Rains

It’s that time again…..

Winter is approaching, now is the time to get construction projects ready. Here are some things to consider:

Cover bare soil. Final grades can be covered with hydroseed, erosion blankets, topsoil, bark or whatever final cover is planned for the project.

Get your hydroseed contractor lined up now and avoid the October rush.

Don’t open up more than a few acres after September 1st.

Grades that aren’t being actively worked can be covered with straw at a rate of 1500 pounds per acre. This is a very cheap and effective way to protect bare soil from raindrop impacts and erosion. Hand seed before spreading the straw. Spray it with water to help hold it in place.

Track your slopes with a Cat: up and down slope, not across slope. The first helps prevent erosion, the second speeds it up.

Use flex pipe drains at bridge ends if your permanent drainage system and curbs are not in place. Collect the water from the bridge using sand bags and divert it to the pipe. Make sure the pipe is long enough to reach the bottom of the slope.

Use a water truck and water seeded areas weekly to get quicker growth. The better the growth going into winter the better.

If you have to open up a large area, only clear and grub small areas. You can clear larger areas if you don’t grub. Roots and slash help protect the bare soil.

Walk the site looking only at erosion controls, thinking ahead of areas that could have a problem. Identify them and start making additions and corrections.

Locate all existing water flows in and around your project and find out where they drain to.

Think about maintenance and regular inspection of erosion controls. When are silt fences going to be inspected and who does it? Who removes mud from check dams? Who covers slopes with straw or other mulch?

Get materials on site now. Again beat the rush for materials in October and November when everyone is in a panic to get plastic and straw. Stockpile enough straw, plastic, silt fence, flex pipe, sand bags, seed, rock, now to cover all areas that are bare.

Set up emergency procedures now. Who should be called in emergencies? Do you have a WSDOT certified Erosion and Spill Control Lead? Brief your personnel on what to do if they see muddy water and who to go to.
Make sure that erosion control material installers know proper installation methods.

Make sure all your silt fence is installed on contour with the ends flared up slope a few feet. If it is not on contour, identify the lowest points of the fence as these will be the failure spots. Install a double row of silt fence at these low spots before you have a failure. Double up your silt fence in areas where eroding slopes could flow into wetlands or streams.

Do you have bare spots where previous seeding hasn’t grown? Cover it with seed and straw if the area is small, remobilize the hydroseeder for larger areas.

Make sure all catch basins within the project boundary are protected with inserts, fence surrounds, or other methods to keep mud out. Locate any catchbasins outside project boundaries that may receive water from your site and protect them.

Make sure that you have a copy of the Stormwater Site Plan (SSP) and Temporary Erosion and Sediment Control plan (TESC) and any grading or environmental permits on site in the job shack. Know what they say. Give each inspector a copy of the SSP and TESC to keep in their truck. These are working copies that can be adapted to site conditions.

Modify your permanent stormwater ponds into temporary sediment ponds by installing a standpipe and blocking the outlet with sand bags. Cut a few small holes in the standpipe to allow for slow release of water. You can also use perforated pipe as the standpipe and hold it in place with “T” posts, wire, and gravel piled up around it.

Use geotextile fabric as a temporary ditch lining to protect bare soil from erosion. Hold the fabric in place with rock check dams, wooden stakes, or sand bags.

Make sure that all check dams are installed so that the top center point is lower than the bottom end points. This prevents endcutting. You may have to add more material to the dam to increase the width, especially on wide ditches with shallow grade side slopes

September 19, 2013

Lessons in Solving Big Weather-Related Problems

Grading and Excavation Contractor
September-October 2003

When it comes to controlling erosion and sediment in bad weather, construction of a third runway at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, near Seattle, WA, qualifies as a genuine challenge. Providing a foundation for the 8,500-ft.-long, 150-ft.-wide runway in the hilly terrain will require an estimated 17 million yd.3 of fill. Since construction began in 1997, about 5 million yd.3 have been placed. It will take a large fleet of dump trucks, running 20 hours a day, three and a half years to bring in the rest. Then there’s all that wet weather the area is famous for, especially in late fall and winter. Two years ago, for example, the project was drenched with about 5 in. of wind-driven rain in one 36-hour period. (more…)

June 2, 2013

Prominent Pierce County Developer Sentenced To Prison For Criminal Violations Of Clean Water Act

Prominent Pierce County Developer Sentenced To Prison For Criminal Violations Of Clean Water Act

One of First Prosecutions in the Nation for Stormwater Violations

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

October 10, 2012

A prominent Sumner, Washington developer was sentenced to prison today in U.S. District Court in Tacoma for a felony violation of the Clean Water Act. BRYAN STOWE, 65, was sentenced to six months in prison, one year of supervised release, and a $300,000 fine for knowingly violating a national pollution discharge elimination permit. In addition, STOWE will make a $100,000 payment to the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation for environmental projects targeting resources impacted by the illegal discharges. STOWE, as president and co-owner of Stowe Construction, Inc., admitted knowingly violating the Construction General Storm Water Permit for the Rainier Park of Industry project, located on West Valley Highway in Sumner. Permit violations contributed to two major landslides at the site in 2010 and 2011. Both slides forced closure of the West Valley Highway. This case is one of the first storm water pollution criminal cases brought in the United States. At sentencing U.S. District Judge Ronald B. Leighton referenced the Clean Water Act saying, “These regulations serve a broad and useful purpose. You violated them persistently. You were wrong.” MORE…

May 19, 2013

Guide to the Meteograms

Filed under: Article, Web Site — Tags: , — Sheetflow @ 12:37 pm

One very useful way to look at a time series of meteorological data at a particular point is by ploting the data in a “meteogram.” In a meteogram, time progresses from left to right across the figure. One or more quantites may be plotted, either as line graphs, bar graphs, symbols, numbers, shading, etc. Using a meteogram, one can get a feel of how conditions change and evolve at a stationary point (termed the “Eulerian” perspective). This is handy because most people are rather stationary with respect to the atmosphere (unless you do a lot of traveling), so a person’s natural perspective is Eulerian. Weather maps, or satellite “movies” are good for giving an overall perspective of the “big picture”, but it can be difficult to tell what will transpire in your particular locality.

seagfs

Keep in mind that like all the other model forecast information provided by COLA, these data are “as is.” They are straight from the computer models at the National Centers for Environmental Research (NCEP) of the National Weather Service. No interpretation, corrections, or other objective or subjective changes have been made. These are not the “official” forecasts, though in most cases they should resemble them rather closely since the official forecasts for your region are based on these models to various extents.
Forecast meteograms are given for selected US cities. In fact, the the forecasts are based on the grid point nearest the city in question. The models cannot directly discern any features of the terrain or atmosphere smaller than the grid resolution (although certain aspects such as the small-scale roughness of the land surface, and the sub-grid scale distribution of thunderstorms are represented indirectly by using parameterizations). Thus these models may not do a good job of forecasting very localized weather such as might be associated with things like mountainous terrain, or sea breezes. MORE…

Thanks to: Weather and Climate Data

April 27, 2013

Airport Embankment Project Tests Erosion Control Options

While building an embankment for a new runway at the Seattle-Tacoma International Airport in Washington, the Port of Seattle is also developing some new erosion control measures to help protect the water quality of nearby creeks and potentially boost compliance with state water-quality standards beyond what is required.

“We want to go the extra mile in keeping sediment on-site and protecting water quality during construction,” maintains David Jenkins, erosion control and stormwater engineer for the port. “We are shooting for a system that will be even better than the prescribed state guidelines and that will fit right in with the way we are building the embankment.”

Read the full article in the Erosion Control Magazine

October 26, 2012

Prominent Pierce County Developer Pleads Guilty To Criminal Violation Of Clean Water Act

Filed under: Article — Sheetflow @ 2:20 am

United States Attorney Jenny A. Durkan
Western District Of Washington
Prominent Pierce County Developer Pleads Guilty To Criminal Violation Of Clean Water Act
Bryan Stowe and Stowe Construction Agree to $750,000 in Fines and Community Service Payments

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE April 12, 2012
A prominent Sumner, Washington developer and his construction company have pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court in Tacoma to felony violations of the Clean Water Act. The charges filed against BRYAN STOWE, 65, and STOWE CONSTRUCTION Inc., are the first storm water pollution criminal charges brought in Western Washington.

Under the terms of the plea agreements, STOWE and STOWE CONSTRUCTION will pay $650,000 in criminal fines and will make a $100,000 payment to the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation for environmental projects targeting resources impacted by the illegal discharges. STOWE could be sentenced to up to three years in prison. Both STOWE and the company will be subject to a court imposed storm water compliance plan for all current and future development sites.

In their plea agreements, the company and STOWE, as president and co-owner of the company, admit they knowingly violated the Construction General Storm Water Permit for the project known as the Rainier Park of Industry, located on West Valley Highway in Sumner, Washington. Permit violations contributed to two major landslides at the project site in the winter of 2011. Both slides forced closure of the West Valley Highway.

Stormwater has been recognized as one of the biggest threats to the health of Puget Sound. Rainwater runoff from developed properties and construction sites contribute a significant amount of pollutants to the wetlands, streams, and rivers that comprise watersheds feeding into Puget Sound. Runoff from construction sites in particular can compromise the essential filtering functions of wetlands if developers fail to implement and maintain required measures to minimize and prevent pollutants from leaving the site.

“In the face of all the political will and economic investment to restore the Puget Sound, this rogue developer knowingly, and repeatedly, chose profit over protection,” said Tyler Amon, acting Director of EPA’s Criminal Investigation Division in Washington D.C. “For more than three years, Mr. Stowe and his construction company ignored the law, devastated salmon habitat and created nightmarish conditions for area drivers. This plea serves as notice to our regional developers … these are serious environmental crimes that will be vigorously pursued.”

According to various records filed in the case, BRYAN STOWE, acting on behalf of STOWE CONSTRUCTION, obtained coverage under the Construction Storm Water General Permit for the West Valley Highway site in October 2006. The permit required STOWE CONSTRUCTION to prepare and implement a plan to prevent the discharge of pollutants through use site improvements and practices designed to minimize and eliminate the migration of pollutants from the site to nearby waters. STOWE admits in the plea agreement to failing to install adequate improvements and practices between 2007 and 2011.

These failures led to significant discharges of pollutants from the site to adjacent wetlands and streams. In addition, the plea agreements acknowledge that weekly site inspection reports and discharge sampling reports intended to assist regulators in assessing the adequacy of site improvement and practices were falsified. State and federal regulators monitoring the West Valley Highway site issued several administrative compliance orders in an unsuccessful effort to bring STOWE and the company into compliance.

These pleas are the second and third pleas entered in connection with this investigation. In December 2011, STOWE CONSTRUCTION employee Timothy Barger pleaded guilty to making false statements to government officials. Barger admitted to falsely representing that site improvements and practices had been adequately installed and maintained at the West Valley Highway site. Barger is scheduled for sentencing in September 2012.

The case was investigated by the Environmental Protection Agency Criminal Investigations Division (EPA-CID) with assistance from the Washington State Department of Ecology and the City of Sumner, Washington. The case is being prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorneys Matthew Diggs and Jim Oesterle.

September 4, 2012

Prepare for Fall and Winter Rains

Winter is approaching, now is the time to get construction projects ready. Here are some things to consider:

Cover bare soil. Final grades can be covered with hydroseed, erosion blankets, topsoil, bark or whatever final cover is planned for the project.

Get your hydroseed contractor lined up now and avoid the October rush.

Don’t open up more than a few acres after September 1st.

Grades that aren’t being actively worked can be covered with straw at a rate of 1500 pounds per acre. This is a very cheap and effective way to protect bare soil from raindrop impacts and erosion. Hand seed before spreading the straw. Spray it with water to help hold it in place.

Track your slopes with a Cat: up and down slope, not across slope. The first helps prevent erosion, the second speeds it up.

Use flex pipe drains at bridge ends if your permanent drainage system and curbs are not in place. Collect the water from the bridge using sand bags and divert it to the pipe. Make sure the pipe is long enough to reach the bottom of the slope.

Use a water truck and water seeded areas weekly to get quicker growth. The better the growth going into winter the better.

If you have to open up a large area, only clear and grub small areas. You can clear larger areas if you don’t grub. Roots and slash help protect the bare soil.

Walk the site looking only at erosion controls, thinking ahead of areas that could have a problem. Identify them and start making additions and corrections.

Locate all existing water flows in and around your project and find out where they drain to.

Think about maintenance and regular inspection of erosion controls. When are silt fences going to be inspected and who does it? Who removes mud from check dams? Who covers slopes with straw or other mulch?

Get materials on site now. Again beat the rush for materials in October and November when everyone is in a panic to get plastic and straw. Stockpile enough straw, plastic, silt fence, flex pipe, sand bags, seed, rock, now to cover all areas that are bare.

Set up emergency procedures now. Who should be called in emergencies? Do you have a WSDOT certified Erosion and Spill Control Lead? Brief your personnel on what to do if they see muddy water and who to go to.
Make sure that erosion control material installers know proper installation methods.

Make sure all your silt fence is installed on contour with the ends flared up slope a few feet. If it is not on contour, identify the lowest points of the fence as these will be the failure spots. Install a double row of silt fence at these low spots before you have a failure. Double up your silt fence in areas where eroding slopes could flow into wetlands or streams.

Do you have bare spots where previous seeding hasn’t grown? Cover it with seed and straw if the area is small, remobilize the hydroseeder for larger areas.

Make sure all catch basins within the project boundary are protected with inserts, fence surrounds, or other methods to keep mud out. Locate any catchbasins outside project boundaries that may receive water from your site and protect them.

Make sure that you have a copy of the Stormwater Site Plan (SSP) and Temporary Erosion and Sediment Control plan (TESC) and any grading or environmental permits on site in the job shack. Know what they say. Give each inspector a copy of the SSP and TESC to keep in their truck. These are working copies that can be adapted to site conditions.

Modify your permanent stormwater ponds into temporary sediment ponds by installing a standpipe and blocking the outlet with sand bags. Cut a few small holes in the standpipe to allow for slow release of water. You can also use perforated pipe as the standpipe and hold it in place with “T” posts, wire, and gravel piled up around it.

Use geotextile fabric as a temporary ditch lining to protect bare soil from erosion. Hold the fabric in place with rock check dams, wooden stakes, or sand bags.

Make sure that all check dams are installed so that the top center point is lower than the bottom end points. This prevents endcutting. You may have to add more material to the dam to increase the width, especially on wide ditches with shallow grade side slopes

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