Sheetflow

February 25, 2011

Construction Stormwater General Permit

Construction Stormwater General Permit

Construction site operators are required to be covered by a Construction Stormwater General Permit if they are engaged in clearing, grading, and excavating activities that disturb one or more acres and discharge stormwater to surface waters of the state. Smaller sites may also require coverage if they are part of a larger common plan of development that will ultimately disturb one acre or more. Operators of regulated construction sites are required to:

  • Develop stormwater pollution prevention plans.
  • Implement sediment, erosion, and pollution prevention control measures.
  • Obtain coverage under this permit.

NEW! - 01/29/09 Ecology issues the Construction Stormwater General Permit December 1, 2010

WebDMRs and PARIS

Contact Us – Contact your Permit Administrator for permit assistance or your Regional Office for site specific questions.

Permit, Forms and Application – Permit, application, forms, and appeal information.

High Turbidity Reporting – Construction projects must report high stormwater turbidity results within 24 hours.  If you get a high result, call your Ecology regional office.

Resources and Guidance – DMRs, Stormwater monitoring,  manuals, 303(d) list information.

CESCL Training and Certification Programs

Historical Information – Pollution Control Hearing Board information, public comments.

Construction Stormwater General Permit.

February 21, 2011

Webinar – Turbidity Reduction Techniques for Pumping Operations on Construction Sites

Filed under: Web Site — Sheetflow @ 11:28 am

International Erosion Control Association (IECA)Webinar

Turbidity Reduction Techniques for Pumping Operations on Construction Sites




Have you ever sampled and measured turbidity numeric levels for pumping or dewatering operations on your construction site? How turbid is your discharge from your work zone while working on a borrow site or pipe culvert near a stream? Will your discharge meet effluent limits prior to entering jurisdictional waters? This webinar will cover a number of techniques to reduce turbidity levels from pumped effluent. Learn about new technologies, design strategies, and case studies to maintain water quality near your construction operation.

Instructor: Ted Sherrod, PE, CPESC, CPSWQ
Date: March 23rd,2011 noon central time
PDH: 1
One certificate is issued (to the registered participant), per paid registration.

Members: $50
Non-Members: $65

Have you ever sampled and measured turbidity numeric levels for pumping or dewatering operations on your construction site? How turbid is your discharge from your work zone while working on a borrow site or pipe culvert near a stream? Will your discharge meet effluent limits prior to entering jurisdictional waters? This webinar will cover a number of techniques to reduce turbidity levels from pumped effluent. Learn about new technologies, design strategies, and case studies to maintain water quality near your construction operation.

For additional information, contact:

IECA
Holly Nicholson
Phone: 303-640-7554
Fax: 866-308-3087
Email: holly@ieca.org

February 18, 2011

Fugitive Dust Control for Heavy Equipment Operators

Filed under: Article — Sheetflow @ 2:58 am




















Graders and Scrapers

  • Use water truck or sprinklers to moisten soils before grading.
  • Minimize areas of clearing and grubbing to a manageable size.
  • Minimize time frames between Fugitive Dust-creating activities and final solutions (ex., roadway excavation and paving).
  • Avoid activity during high winds.


Front-End Loaders and Backhoes

  • Use water truck to keep soils moist.
  • Use water sprays when dumping soils into haul trucks.
  • Minimize drop height.
  • Avoid activity during high winds.

FROM: Guide to Handling Fugitive Dust from Construction Projects, AGC of WA Ed. Foundation. 1997

MODIFIED for the WEB: David S. Jenkins 2/2009

February 11, 2011

Rocked Construction Entrance?

Filed under: Photo — Sheetflow @ 7:00 am

February 4, 2011

What’s Wrong with this Picture?

Filed under: Photo — Sheetflow @ 8:30 am

The large bung plug was not replaced and rain was allowed into the drum, displacing the chemical inside. The quantity of product that escaped onto the ground was only about 10 to 15 gallons, but since this occurred over a period of several weeks, the surrounding soil was contaminated. The total cost of the cleanup was just under $900 dollars. This could easily have been prevented with regular inspections.

February 3, 2011

Construction General NPDES Permit Appealed

Filed under: Article — Tags: , , , , — Sheetflow @ 1:29 pm

On December 29th, 2010, the Puget Soundkeeper Alliance filed a Notice of Appeal with the Washington State Pollution Control Hearings Board. The appeal calls for a re-write and reissue as they consider the permit to be ” unlawful and unfair” because it does not meet the “requirements or intent” of the Clean Water Act, Environmental Protection Agency rules, Washington state water quality law ( RCW 98.40 and WAC 173-201A), or Department of Ecology rules.

The document can be read here:
Puget Soundkeeper Alliance Notice of Appeal

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