Sheetflow Construction Turbidity, Erosion, & Sediment Control

November 25, 2017

Guide to Handling Fugitive Dust from Construction Projects

Download: Guide to Handling Fugitive Dust from Construction Projects.PDF

The classic brochure developed in 1997 by the Associated General Contractors (AGC) of Washington Education Foundation and the Fugitive Dust Task Force, Seattle, Washington. Updated and edited for the Internet by: www.sheetflow.com, February 2009.

February 18, 2017

Fugitive Dust Control for Heavy Equipment Operators

Filed under: Article — Sheetflow @ 2:58 am




















Graders and Scrapers

  • Use water truck or sprinklers to moisten soils before grading.
  • Minimize areas of clearing and grubbing to a manageable size.
  • Minimize time frames between Fugitive Dust-creating activities and final solutions (ex., roadway excavation and paving).
  • Avoid activity during high winds.


Front-End Loaders and Backhoes

  • Use water truck to keep soils moist.
  • Use water sprays when dumping soils into haul trucks.
  • Minimize drop height.
  • Avoid activity during high winds.

FROM: Guide to Handling Fugitive Dust from Construction Projects, AGC of WA Ed. Foundation. 1997

MODIFIED for the WEB: David S. Jenkins 2/2009

October 3, 2016

Construction General NPDES Permit Appealed

Filed under: Article — Tags: , , , , — Sheetflow @ 1:29 pm

On December 29th, 2010, the Puget Soundkeeper Alliance filed a Notice of Appeal with the Washington State Pollution Control Hearings Board. The appeal calls for a re-write and reissue as they consider the permit to be ” unlawful and unfair” because it does not meet the “requirements or intent” of the Clean Water Act, Environmental Protection Agency rules, Washington state water quality law ( RCW 98.40 and WAC 173-201A), or Department of Ecology rules.

The document can be read here:
Puget Soundkeeper Alliance Notice of Appeal

June 16, 2016

Paying for TESC

Filed under: Article — Sheetflow @ 2:49 am

The Best Way to Measure and Pay for Erosion Control in Public Works Contracts

It is a big mistake to make temporary erosion and sediment an “incidental” item in a public works contract. Anything that can be measured should be and set up as a Unit Price item. Planning and Implementation can be lump sum but measurement and payment must be clearly specified. Force Account is set up for unforeseen conditions; the amount is set by the owner so that everyone bids the same number. Make clear at the pre-bid meeting that the Lump Sum bid for planning and implementation covers lots of stuff and they need to bid accordingly. Here is an example of the best way to pay: (more…)

November 26, 2015

Preparing for the Rainy Season

Filed under: Article — Sheetflow @ 4:58 pm

Dirty Water Flowing in Ditch

Preparing for the Rainy Season
David S. Jenkins
WSDOT Statewide Erosion Control Coordinator
September 1997

Now that the El Nino has ended and the La Nina has begun, the National Weather Service is predicting a much wetter fall and winter than normal. So, what are some things you can do now to prepare? How about: (more…)

June 25, 2015

Low Impact Development for Public Works Construction

Filed under: Article — Tags: , , , , , , , , , — Sheetflow @ 3:27 am

Low Impact Development for Public Works Construction:
Erosion and Sediment Control Compliance

David S. Jenkins, Seattle, Washington

Introduction
Construction is a messy business; in the Puget Sound region of western Washington, with average annual rainfall of 40″ to 60″, it can also be challenging. Uncontrolled erosion from a construction site can generate 10-1000 times the quantity of sediment that occurs naturally from vegetated areas. Most construction in western Washington occurs near wetlands, streams, lakes, or the Puget Sound where sediment loss can reduce beneficial uses, or worse, destroy a salmon stream.

This paper will discuss proven methods that public works professionals can utilise to improve erosion control compliance and reduce project impacts.
(more…)

April 30, 2015

Jean M. Jenkins – April 8, 1925 to April 27, 2015

Filed under: Article — Tags: , , , , , — Sheetflow @ 2:34 am

To the best mom ever! They said you wouldn’t live past 17, you lived to 90, outliving all of them.

War bride from Vancouver, Canada, married Cyril Jenkins in 1946, obtained her citizenship, moved to Los Angeles, raised 3 boys, moved to Bremerton to start a new life, married 55 years until Cy’s death, lost her oldest son to cancer, only finished 3rd grade leaving because of TB but was the smartest person I have known, both book smart and life smart. I love and miss you terribly and am glad you are with Cy and Steve. Bye Sweetheart.

mom boatshed closeup bw

June 1, 2014

How to Design and Install a Wheel Wash

How to Design and Install a Wheel Wash
By: Mark Kestner, Ph.D.

National Environmental Service Co., Inc.
7 Hampshire Drive, Mendham, NJ 07945 Tel: 973-543-4586 www.drdust.com
Presented at: California Mining Association Annual Meeting 2005, Squaw Valley, CA May 24-27

Introduction

Quarries, ready-mix plants, construction sites and other industrial facilities have become the
targets of new regulations designed to prevent track-out of mud, dust and dirt on to public roads. These
regulations have been developed primarily in response to Federal EPA actions that have designated many
metropolitan areas as “non-attainment” for their failure to comply with air quality standards for fine
particulate. Fine particulate, known as PM10 and fine respirable particulate, PM2.5, are now regarded as
the number one health hazard in urban environments. These particles are so small that they become
lodged in the aveoli of the lungs where they can cause or aggravate a variety of respiratory diseases
including asthma, emphysema and lung cancer.
Local governments in non-attainment areas are forced to take draconian measures to comply with
fine particulate standards or face the loss of federal highway funds. As a result, cities like Los Angeles
and Phoenix, have or are in the process of adopting rules that require affected facilities to install wheel
washes. The South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) in California, for example, has
recently passed Rule 1157 that will mandate the use of rumble grates and tire washes.
In other areas of the country, encroaching residential and commercial development around
industrial sites has led to an increased demand for wheel washes. Many companies, particularly stone
quarries, have installed wheel washes in order to get out in front of regulation and demonstrate their
willingness to be good neighbors. Other facilities are forced into compliance through fines and litigation.

Faced with state and local governments under the threat of federal action and a public unwilling
to tolerate any pollution, companies need to take a hard look at how best to respond. Because the costs of
pollution control equipment are difficult to recover, affected facilities have a real incentive to develop
affordable and effective technology to prevent carryout.
….MORE….

February 1, 2014

Polymer Use and Testing for Erosion and Sediment Control on Construction Sites

Filed under: Article — Tags: , , , , , , — Sheetflow @ 12:15 pm

January-February 2001
Erosion Control Magazine

Polymer Use and Testing for Erosion and Sediment Control on Construction Sites
By Scott Tobiason, David Jenkins, Ed Molash, Stacey Rush

Tested in the soggy La Niña weather conditions of the Pacific Northwest, chemical polymers promise a cost-effective, safe way to prevent soil erosion and remove suspended sediments from construction-site runoff.

References
Azzam, R.A.I. “Agricultural Polymers, Polyacrylamide Preparation, Application and Prospects in Soil Conditioning.” Commercial Soil Science Plant Analysis. 11:235-243. 1980.

Betz Laboratories. Material Safety Data Sheet for Betz Polymer 1190. PFW 2819101. Betz Industrial Laboratories, Macon, GA. 1995.

Bremerton Sun. “Giant Retailer Pledges to be OGood Neighbor.'” West Sound, Section B. February 3, 1996, p. 1.

Calgon Corporation. Material Safety Data Sheet for Cat-Floc 2953 Liquid Cationic Polymer. Bulletin No. 12-485. Calgon Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA. 1997.

King County. Surface Water Design Manual. King County (WA) Department of Public Works. Revised November 1994.

Minton, G. “Use of Polymer to Treat Construction Site Stormwater.” Proceedings of Conference XXX. International Erosion Control Association, Steamboat Springs, CO. February 22-26, 1999, pp. 175-188.

Roa, A. Screening of Polymers to Determine Their Potential Use on Construction Sites. Publication No. 101-96. University of Idaho, Moscow, ID. 1996, pp. 77-83.

Sojka, R.E. and R.D. Lentz. A PAM Primer: A Brief History of PAM and PAM-related Issues. Publication No. 101-96. University of Idaho, Moscow, ID. 1996, pp. 11-20.

University of Georgia. “Georgia Adopts New Turbidity Standard.” Waterwise. University of Georgia, College of Environmental Sciences, Athens, GA. January 1998.

Washington Department of Ecology. Stormwater Management Manual for the Puget Sound Basin. Publication No. 91-75. 1992.

September 19, 2013

Lessons in Solving Big Weather-Related Problems

Grading and Excavation Contractor
September-October 2003

When it comes to controlling erosion and sediment in bad weather, construction of a third runway at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, near Seattle, WA, qualifies as a genuine challenge. Providing a foundation for the 8,500-ft.-long, 150-ft.-wide runway in the hilly terrain will require an estimated 17 million yd.3 of fill. Since construction began in 1997, about 5 million yd.3 have been placed. It will take a large fleet of dump trucks, running 20 hours a day, three and a half years to bring in the rest. Then there’s all that wet weather the area is famous for, especially in late fall and winter. Two years ago, for example, the project was drenched with about 5 in. of wind-driven rain in one 36-hour period. (more…)

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