Sheetflow Construction Erosion and Sediment Control

August 13, 2019

The Soaker Tire wash

Filed under: Video,Web Site — Sheetflow @ 7:23 am

These are great as long as the tires are not too muddy, the mud is not too sticky and the vehicle load is not too high. Most of the water is directed to the sidewalls and misses much of the mud hiding in the treads. These work great as the final , clean rinse cycle in conjunction with a tire bath best management practice. Chemical flocculants can be added to the water to remove much of the sediment load. Web site: www.sheetflow.com

Description from the website: http://www.thesoaker.com/

“The Soaker” is a portable, self-contained and environmentally friendly wheel washing system. The system does not require city power or water connected to it which makes it highly portable.

“The Soaker” can be installed on job sites, dump sites and material pits to help keep the surrounding streets free of mud and dirt.

Its aluminum and stainless steel construction makes “The Soaker” environmentally friendly.

It features a high capacity main tank of 4000 gallons and a reserve tank of 2000 gallons. Its adjustable spray heads provide a low pressure/high volume water stream of up to 1000gpm. Motion sensors detect the vehicles on approach and turn on the pumps so the water spray is at full power by the time the vehicles go through the wheel wash.

“The Soaker” is manufactured to provide solutions to problems such as portability, road pollution, costly cleaning processes, fines and violations for depositing debris onto public highways, etc…

“The Soaker” can be rented on a monthly basis or purchased. A lease purchase option is also available. For more information about “The Soaker” wheel washing system, please call us at: (818) 952-6752 or email at: soakerinfo@thesoaker.com

June 14, 2019

Horizontal Silt Fence

Photo: David Jenkins

Walking around South Congress district south of downtown Austin, I discovered a new best management practice-horizontal silt fence. This makes access to the work area so much easier than if vertical silt fence was used. Fortunately no rain in the near future.

June 13, 2019

Roadhouse Relics

Didn’t find much in the way erosion in Austin, but had a great time at Roadhouse Relics visiting with the owner, Todd Sanders.

Copyright:Roadhouse Relics, Austin, Texas

May 21, 2019

Searching for Erosion in Austin, Texas

Still no erosion. Ruby Dee and the Snakehandlers
Photo: David Jenkins

May 20, 2019

Searching for Erosion in Austin, Texas

Filed under: Photo,Web Site — Tags: , , , , , — Sheetflow @ 8:44 am
Jimmie Vaughan at Antone’s
Photo: David Jenkins

May 19, 2019

Searching for Erosion in Austin, Texas

Filed under: Photo,Web Site — Tags: , , , , — Sheetflow @ 8:45 am
No erosion. Antone’s
Photo: David Jenkins

May 18, 2019

Searching for Erosion in Austin, Texas

No erosion, just clean water. Lone Star Beer
Photo: David Jenkins

May 16, 2019

Searching for Erosion in Austin, Texas

No erosion at Salt Lick BBQ
Photo: David Jenkins

March 21, 2017

Webinar – Turbidity Reduction Techniques for Pumping Operations on Construction Sites

Filed under: Web Site — Sheetflow @ 11:28 am

International Erosion Control Association (IECA)Webinar

Turbidity Reduction Techniques for Pumping Operations on Construction Sites




Have you ever sampled and measured turbidity numeric levels for pumping or dewatering operations on your construction site? How turbid is your discharge from your work zone while working on a borrow site or pipe culvert near a stream? Will your discharge meet effluent limits prior to entering jurisdictional waters? This webinar will cover a number of techniques to reduce turbidity levels from pumped effluent. Learn about new technologies, design strategies, and case studies to maintain water quality near your construction operation.

Instructor: Ted Sherrod, PE, CPESC, CPSWQ
Date: March 23rd,2011 noon central time
PDH: 1
One certificate is issued (to the registered participant), per paid registration.

Members: $50
Non-Members: $65

Have you ever sampled and measured turbidity numeric levels for pumping or dewatering operations on your construction site? How turbid is your discharge from your work zone while working on a borrow site or pipe culvert near a stream? Will your discharge meet effluent limits prior to entering jurisdictional waters? This webinar will cover a number of techniques to reduce turbidity levels from pumped effluent. Learn about new technologies, design strategies, and case studies to maintain water quality near your construction operation.

For additional information, contact:

IECA
Holly Nicholson
Phone: 303-640-7554
Fax: 866-308-3087
Email: holly@ieca.org

April 10, 2016

EPA to Reconsider Key Aspect of Construction Stormwater Rule

Filed under: Web Site — Sheetflow @ 1:19 pm

Published on Marten Law (http://www.martenlaw.com)

September 30, 2010
Meline MacCurdy
Russell Prugh

Nearly a year after finalizing its construction stormwater rule, in response to objections from industry groups, EPA has conceded that the controversial numeric turbidity limit in the rule is flawed. EPA issued the final construction stormwater effluent guidelines rule[1] (the “Rule”) in December 2009, for the first time establishing a numeric limit on the turbidity of stormwater discharges from large construction sites and requiring monitoring to ensure compliance with the numeric limit. The Rule also required nearly all construction sites that obtain stormwater permits after February 1, 2010 to implement a range of erosion and sediment controls and pollution prevention measures. EPA’s Rule elicited immediate criticism, including a lawsuit brought by industry groups in the Seventh Circuit,[2] and a petition for administrative review by the Small Business Administration (“SBA”) Office of Advocacy. A primary element of these challenges was the claim that EPA’s numeric turbidity limit is flawed. (more…)

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