Sheetflow Construction Erosion and Sediment Control

July 16, 2019

Tree Protection Using Orange Safety Fence

July 9, 2019

Managing Construction Stormwater on Concrete Tiltup Building Project

Video: David Jenkins

March 19, 2019

Unrolled Asphalt Berm Edge Clean Water Diversion

Here is another cool trick for keeping clean water out of your project. The contractor put down ATB (asphalt-treated base) and asphalt but didn’t roll (compact) the edge, which left a 3 or 4 inch berm. Clean rain water was kept on the asphalt rather than flowing off into the dirt shoulder and disturbed areas.

March 8, 2019

Curb Inlet Protection

According to the Minnesota Stormwater Manual:

“Inlet protection devices intercept and/or filter sediment before it can be transported from a site into the storm drain system and discharged into a lake, river, stream, wetland, or other waterbody.

These devices also keep sediment from filling or clogging storm drain pipes, ditches, and downgradient sediment traps or ponds.

Inlet protection may also include placement of a barrier to create a bypass of an inlet transferring flow downstream to a sediment trap, basin, or other inlet discharging to a non-critical area.”

Nothing wrong with sediment control BMPs, as they are necessary tools in an effective erosion and sediment control system.  However, these do not “filter” sediment. 

When properly installed, these allow for ponding of water which allows larger sediment to settle out, keeping it out of the storm system.  This is a good thing, but doesn’t necessarily prevent water quality non-compliance.   

I do like this statement in the manual : “Caution: To the extent feasible, erosion prevention practices such as stabilization are preferred to sediment control practices.”

In my world, where we have to meet a turbidity effluent limit of 25 NTUs, stabilization and stormwater management are the primary methods used to meet strict turbidity limits.  

February 23, 2019

More Clean Water Diversion Best Management Practices

This shows several simple water diversion berms in action during a heavy rain. While the construction project is complete and the grass has grown, you can see how they prevented erosion during the project when bare dirt was exposed to rain.

January 14, 2019

Bonded Fiber Matrix BFM Needs to Cure Before it Rains

Bonded fiber matrix (BFM) needs to dry for 24 to 36 hours before it rains or else it can start to wash off.

December 2, 2018

Construction Erosion Inspection Hog Fuel Mulch Prevents Fugitive Dust

You are hauling dirt on a dry day and the dust is flying.
The water truck driver’s head is about to explode trying to keep up with the dust control.
Save yourself a Labor and Industries claim!
Use ground up vegetation (hog fuel)! Don’t haul it to the landfill.

January 27, 2013

EPA Construction Site Stormwater Runoff Control

Construction Site Stormwater Runoff Control

Poorly maintained BMPs can result in significant quantities of sediment being discharged to storm drains.
Uncontrolled stormwater runoff from construction sites can significantly impact rivers, lakes and estuaries. Sediment in waterbodies from construction sites can reduce the amount of sunlight reaching aquatic plants, clog fish gills, smother aquatic habitat and spawning areas, and impede navigation.

Phase II MS4s are required to develop a program to reduce pollutants in stormwater runoff to the MS4 for construction sites disturbing one or more acres. This primarily includes developing:

An ordinance,
Requirements to implement erosion and sediment control best managment practices (BMPs),
Requirements to control other waste at the construction site,
Procedures for reviewing construction site plans,
Procedures to receive and consider information submitted by the public, and
Procedures for inspections and enforcement of stormwater requirements at construction sites.
In addition to the stormwater requirements that Phase II MS4s place on construction sites, construction operators must also apply for NPDES permit coverage if their project disturbs at least one acre and discharges to a waterbody.

A description of these requirements is available at EPA’s stormwater construction website.

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