Sheetflow Construction Erosion and Sediment Control

July 25, 2019

Nope, Just an Uncovered Stockpile after a Rain Storm

Photo: David Jenkins

July 24, 2019

River Delta from Space?

Photo: David Jenkins

July 23, 2019

Lobster Protection in Portland, Maine

In Washington, it’s salmon protection.

July 16, 2019

Tree Protection Using Orange Safety Fence

May 16, 2019

Searching for Erosion in Austin, Texas

No erosion at Salt Lick BBQ
Photo: David Jenkins

March 8, 2019

Curb Inlet Protection

According to the Minnesota Stormwater Manual:

“Inlet protection devices intercept and/or filter sediment before it can be transported from a site into the storm drain system and discharged into a lake, river, stream, wetland, or other waterbody.

These devices also keep sediment from filling or clogging storm drain pipes, ditches, and downgradient sediment traps or ponds.

Inlet protection may also include placement of a barrier to create a bypass of an inlet transferring flow downstream to a sediment trap, basin, or other inlet discharging to a non-critical area.”

Nothing wrong with sediment control BMPs, as they are necessary tools in an effective erosion and sediment control system.  However, these do not “filter” sediment. 

When properly installed, these allow for ponding of water which allows larger sediment to settle out, keeping it out of the storm system.  This is a good thing, but doesn’t necessarily prevent water quality non-compliance.   

I do like this statement in the manual : “Caution: To the extent feasible, erosion prevention practices such as stabilization are preferred to sediment control practices.”

In my world, where we have to meet a turbidity effluent limit of 25 NTUs, stabilization and stormwater management are the primary methods used to meet strict turbidity limits.  

February 2, 2019

Why Power Brooms are a Bad Idea

Filed under: Video — Tags: , , , , , , — Sheetflow @ 10:13 am

As you can see, these types of sweepers don’t pick up dirt and sediment from asphalt, they just spread it around.

Water spray system attachments help some but then the sweeper mostly turns the dirt to mud and smears it around.

These are useful for picking up gravel and sand.

A vacuum sweeper is the way to go.

January 14, 2019

Bonded Fiber Matrix BFM Needs to Cure Before it Rains

Bonded fiber matrix (BFM) needs to dry for 24 to 36 hours before it rains or else it can start to wash off.

December 2, 2018

Construction Erosion Inspection Hog Fuel Mulch Prevents Fugitive Dust

You are hauling dirt on a dry day and the dust is flying.
The water truck driver’s head is about to explode trying to keep up with the dust control.
Save yourself a Labor and Industries claim!
Use ground up vegetation (hog fuel)! Don’t haul it to the landfill.

June 2, 2013

Prominent Pierce County Developer Sentenced To Prison For Criminal Violations Of Clean Water Act

Prominent Pierce County Developer Sentenced To Prison For Criminal Violations Of Clean Water Act

One of First Prosecutions in the Nation for Stormwater Violations

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

October 10, 2012

A prominent Sumner, Washington developer was sentenced to prison today in U.S. District Court in Tacoma for a felony violation of the Clean Water Act. BRYAN STOWE, 65, was sentenced to six months in prison, one year of supervised release, and a $300,000 fine for knowingly violating a national pollution discharge elimination permit. In addition, STOWE will make a $100,000 payment to the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation for environmental projects targeting resources impacted by the illegal discharges. STOWE, as president and co-owner of Stowe Construction, Inc., admitted knowingly violating the Construction General Storm Water Permit for the Rainier Park of Industry project, located on West Valley Highway in Sumner. Permit violations contributed to two major landslides at the site in 2010 and 2011. Both slides forced closure of the West Valley Highway. This case is one of the first storm water pollution criminal cases brought in the United States. At sentencing U.S. District Judge Ronald B. Leighton referenced the Clean Water Act saying, “These regulations serve a broad and useful purpose. You violated them persistently. You were wrong.” MORE…

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