Sheetflow Construction Erosion and Sediment Control

June 18, 2019

Fugitive Dust Control Compliance at the Port of Seattle

Download: Fugitive Dust Control Compliance at the Port of Seattle

March 1, 2019

Managing Construction Projects to Prevent Sediment Trackout

I originally submitted this abstract for the 2019 IECA Denver conference . It was not accepted as a presentation but as an article in the October 2018 edition “Environmental Connection Magazine”.

Abstract
Sediment tracking from construction sites onto public roads and highways is a continual source or frustration for both regulators and contractors. The standard best management practices (BMPs) available, such as stabilized construction entrances and sweepers, often don’t work at all and, at best, only reduce total sediment by 30-50% which is inadequate for preventing water quality violations. In addition to water quality problems, sediment tracking onto roadways can generate dust, which may violate clean air standards and cause unsafe conditions, especially on highways.
This paper will discuss BMPs, methods, and procedures, which can be used by contractors to prevent sediment from being tracked onto roadways in the first place. In addition, ways to significantly reduce sediment loss will be presented. Some of these methods include:

• Passive tire baths
• Various tire washes
• Keeping vehicles of dirt
• Vacuum vs. mechanical sweepers
• Road washing
• Contract specifications

Each method will be discussed with pros and cons, design information and contract specifications.

The full magazine can be found at:
Environmental Connection, October/November 2018, Volume 13, Issue 4.

The article is attached below:

February 1, 2014

Polymer Use and Testing for Erosion and Sediment Control on Construction Sites

Filed under: Article — Tags: , , , , , , — Sheetflow @ 12:15 pm

January-February 2001
Erosion Control Magazine

Polymer Use and Testing for Erosion and Sediment Control on Construction Sites
By Scott Tobiason, David Jenkins, Ed Molash, Stacey Rush

Tested in the soggy La Niña weather conditions of the Pacific Northwest, chemical polymers promise a cost-effective, safe way to prevent soil erosion and remove suspended sediments from construction-site runoff.

References
Azzam, R.A.I. “Agricultural Polymers, Polyacrylamide Preparation, Application and Prospects in Soil Conditioning.” Commercial Soil Science Plant Analysis. 11:235-243. 1980.

Betz Laboratories. Material Safety Data Sheet for Betz Polymer 1190. PFW 2819101. Betz Industrial Laboratories, Macon, GA. 1995.

Bremerton Sun. “Giant Retailer Pledges to be OGood Neighbor.'” West Sound, Section B. February 3, 1996, p. 1.

Calgon Corporation. Material Safety Data Sheet for Cat-Floc 2953 Liquid Cationic Polymer. Bulletin No. 12-485. Calgon Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA. 1997.

King County. Surface Water Design Manual. King County (WA) Department of Public Works. Revised November 1994.

Minton, G. “Use of Polymer to Treat Construction Site Stormwater.” Proceedings of Conference XXX. International Erosion Control Association, Steamboat Springs, CO. February 22-26, 1999, pp. 175-188.

Roa, A. Screening of Polymers to Determine Their Potential Use on Construction Sites. Publication No. 101-96. University of Idaho, Moscow, ID. 1996, pp. 77-83.

Sojka, R.E. and R.D. Lentz. A PAM Primer: A Brief History of PAM and PAM-related Issues. Publication No. 101-96. University of Idaho, Moscow, ID. 1996, pp. 11-20.

University of Georgia. “Georgia Adopts New Turbidity Standard.” Waterwise. University of Georgia, College of Environmental Sciences, Athens, GA. January 1998.

Washington Department of Ecology. Stormwater Management Manual for the Puget Sound Basin. Publication No. 91-75. 1992.

April 27, 2013

Airport Embankment Project Tests Erosion Control Options

While building an embankment for a new runway at the Seattle-Tacoma International Airport in Washington, the Port of Seattle is also developing some new erosion control measures to help protect the water quality of nearby creeks and potentially boost compliance with state water-quality standards beyond what is required.

“We want to go the extra mile in keeping sediment on-site and protecting water quality during construction,” maintains David Jenkins, erosion control and stormwater engineer for the port. “We are shooting for a system that will be even better than the prescribed state guidelines and that will fit right in with the way we are building the embankment.”

Read the full article in the Erosion Control Magazine

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