Sheetflow Construction Erosion and Sediment Control

October 6, 2019

Construction Entrance Fail

This is a 30 + acre site with one access point, this one. If this was my project, I would have specified a tire wash with an asphalt exit to the street. The tire wash would have been long enough for two tire rotations, have high pressure, low volume nozzles located such that all tire surfaces were sprayed. This system would also have an on-board, treatment polymer injection system to keep the tire wash water relatively clean. I would have specified that the water be tested for turbidity daily, measured at 50 NTUs or less. Since the water is classified as “process water”, I would have required it to be tested for metals and other contaminants, then hauled to an appropriate disposal facility.
Photo: David Jenkins

October 1, 2019

Yet Another Truck On Asphalt

Filed under: Video — Tags: , , , , — Sheetflow @ 3:09 am

Prevention is the cheapest way to keep tires clean.

September 25, 2019

Not What an Inspector Wants to See

I just did a quick, random, drive-by of a job and this is what I saw. This might tell me that the construction staff, owner and contractor, don’t understand what is required or, haven’t read the TESC specifications.

Since this was a random, unannounced, drive-by, I might think that this is not an isolated incident. While I prefer a site be kept clean, as long as stuff doesn’t leave the project boundary, I don’t have an issue. However, by not keeping the site clean, trackout is inevitable.

Also, note the Bobcat broom sweeper just inside the fence on the left; these are great for pushing dirt around and up in the air but we only allow vacuum sweepers on projects, so I don’t know why this is on site.

I sent an email to the engineer suggesting that everyone might want to review the TESC spec. and take necessary actions so this doesn’t keep happening. Also, rain is forecast for tonight.

The fence line is the project boundary. Photo: David Jenkins
This is a visible, inspector magnet, just inviting increased scrutiny. Photo: David Jenkins

August 13, 2019

The Soaker Tire wash

These are great as long as the tires are not too muddy, the mud is not too sticky and the vehicle load is not too high. Most of the water is directed to the sidewalls and misses much of the mud hiding in the treads. These work great as the final , clean rinse cycle in conjunction with a tire bath best management practice. Chemical flocculants can be added to the water to remove much of the sediment load. Web site: www.sheetflow.com

Description from the website: http://www.thesoaker.com/

“The Soaker” is a portable, self-contained and environmentally friendly wheel washing system. The system does not require city power or water connected to it which makes it highly portable.

“The Soaker” can be installed on job sites, dump sites and material pits to help keep the surrounding streets free of mud and dirt.

Its aluminum and stainless steel construction makes “The Soaker” environmentally friendly.

It features a high capacity main tank of 4000 gallons and a reserve tank of 2000 gallons. Its adjustable spray heads provide a low pressure/high volume water stream of up to 1000gpm. Motion sensors detect the vehicles on approach and turn on the pumps so the water spray is at full power by the time the vehicles go through the wheel wash.

“The Soaker” is manufactured to provide solutions to problems such as portability, road pollution, costly cleaning processes, fines and violations for depositing debris onto public highways, etc…

“The Soaker” can be rented on a monthly basis or purchased. A lease purchase option is also available. For more information about “The Soaker” wheel washing system, please call us at: (818) 952-6752 or email at: soakerinfo@thesoaker.com

July 30, 2019

Sediment Trackout Fail

Photo: Dave Jenkins

I’m not a big fan of the “Grizzly” method of trackout prevention. My standard is “No visible trackout” and these have never met that standard. Preventing tires from getting dirty in the first place is still the best BMP!

June 15, 2019

Erosion in Austin

photo:David Jenkins

I did find some erosion in Austin.

February 16, 2019

Vacuum Sweeper Maintenance

If I specify a vacuum sweeper on a construction project, I expect it to be operational.

I require all systems to be functional per manufacturers specifications.

If not, the sweeper goes away, maybe the job is shut down, until a working sweeper is brought to the site.

Specifications:
1) Power brooms shall not be utilized without prior approval by
the Engineer.

2) Contractor shall have sufficient working vacuum sweepers on
site at all times work is being performed.

3) All sweepers shall have on-board water spray systems that
shall be operating at all times.

4) systems shall function per manufacturer specifications
including, but not limited to, spray water systems, blowers,
vacuum nozzles, hoses, debris hopper, hydraulics and
electrical.

5) At no time shall debris hopper seals leak debris and liquids.

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