Sheetflow Construction Erosion and Sediment Control

October 30, 2019

Open Catch Basin Fixed Again

Filed under: Photo — Tags: , , , , , — Sheetflow @ 4:59 am
Back where we started, 30 mil PVC blocking the catch basin. Photo: David Jenkins

As of two days ago, there is new 30 mil PVC under the catch basin grate and turbid water is not draining into the catch basin. The contractor told their staff not to puncture the PVC. No word on whether they are thinking more proactively about this. The best measure is to keep the stockpile covered and the area cleaned up. We shall see what’s next.

October 21, 2019

“Means and Methods” vs. Best Management Practices

Demolition of landside crane rail on a shipping container terminal.

In my experience, managing contractor “means and methods” is more important than using the “right” best management practices. When turbidity is the standard for measuring water quality compliance, as in Washington state, site cleanliness is the key to prevention and compliance.

This contract requires that catch basin inserts be installed in all catch basins within the project boundaries. However, inserts are not at all effective in reducing turbidity in runoff. While removing the crane rail on this container terminal project, the contractor could clean up as the work progresses, place all material removed from the trench onto plastic for later removal, load into a Bobcat bucket, and pick up small debris with a shop vac. I can require these things in the contract that the contractor bids. It may cost extra; the extra cost may be worth it if it reduces my risk. If I tell the contractor after the contract is awarded, I will pay more.

I can also make suggestions during the work, pointing out that keeping things really clean will keep them in compliance with their NPDES permit. If framed in a way that shows benefit to the contractor, meaning reducing risk and cost, they will probably follow the suggestion.

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