Sheetflow Construction Erosion and Sediment Control

November 6, 2019

Sometimes There’s Just Too Much Rain

Filed under: Photo — Tags: , , , , , , , — Sheetflow @ 1:08 pm
November 6, 2006 Sea-Tac, Washington Photo: David Jenkins

We were building a new runway, had several hundred acres of open ground, when the big rains came. We were using the stormwater ponds to collect all of the water for a 10 year 24 hour storm event, or 3 inches of rain. All of the water in the ponds was being treated with chitosan-enhanced sand filtration systems before discharge.

The storm of November 6, 2006 was something over the 50 year 24 hour event and something under the 100 year 24 hour event. With the rainfall and the pond over topping, water was discovered draining from the base of the pond. Rock and ecoblocks were placed as an emergency fix to keep the pond from a catastrophic failure. All of the dirty water drained to a creek, but, nothing we could do.

March 19, 2019

Unrolled Asphalt Berm Edge Clean Water Diversion

Here is another cool trick for keeping clean water out of your project. The contractor put down ATB (asphalt-treated base) and asphalt but didn’t roll (compact) the edge, which left a 3 or 4 inch berm. Clean rain water was kept on the asphalt rather than flowing off into the dirt shoulder and disturbed areas.

January 27, 2013

EPA Construction Site Stormwater Runoff Control

Construction Site Stormwater Runoff Control

Poorly maintained BMPs can result in significant quantities of sediment being discharged to storm drains.
Uncontrolled stormwater runoff from construction sites can significantly impact rivers, lakes and estuaries. Sediment in waterbodies from construction sites can reduce the amount of sunlight reaching aquatic plants, clog fish gills, smother aquatic habitat and spawning areas, and impede navigation.

Phase II MS4s are required to develop a program to reduce pollutants in stormwater runoff to the MS4 for construction sites disturbing one or more acres. This primarily includes developing:

An ordinance,
Requirements to implement erosion and sediment control best managment practices (BMPs),
Requirements to control other waste at the construction site,
Procedures for reviewing construction site plans,
Procedures to receive and consider information submitted by the public, and
Procedures for inspections and enforcement of stormwater requirements at construction sites.
In addition to the stormwater requirements that Phase II MS4s place on construction sites, construction operators must also apply for NPDES permit coverage if their project disturbs at least one acre and discharges to a waterbody.

A description of these requirements is available at EPA’s stormwater construction website.

Powered by WordPress