Sheetflow Erosion Control Erosion Control for the CESCL

May 2, 2021

Do You Need a Tire Wash?

Filed under: Article — Tags: , , , — Sheetflow @ 7:46 pm

Driving through a tire wash during 3rd runway construction at SeaTac International Airport in 2006.
Photo: David Jenkins-Sheetflow Erosion Control

Why do you Need a Tire Wash?

Here are some reasons for a project designer to consider:

  1. You’re going to do earthwork in the wet season;
  2. Neighbors are watching what you are doing;
  3. Your project is controversial;
  4. You are cleaning up a contaminated site;
  5. You have a lot of truck and vehicle traffic driving through dirt and mud;
  6. Construction vehicles exit onto busy, public roads.

October 2, 2020

Excellent Tire Wash

Photo: Troy Modie-Port of Seattle

This here is an excellent tire wash. Why? Because it is long enough for two tire rotations. In addition, quarry spalls are installed at the entrance and exit of the tire wash. To the left of the tire wash, the contractor placed quarry spalls so vehicles entering the project don’t have to drive through the tire wash.

August 13, 2019

Soaker Tire Wash

These are great as long as the tires are not too muddy, the mud is not too sticky and the vehicle load is not too high. Most of the water is directed to the sidewalls and misses much of the mud hiding in the treads. These work great as the final , clean rinse cycle in conjunction with a tire bath best management practice. Chemical flocculants can be added to the water to remove much of the sediment load. Web site: www.sheetflow.com

Description from the website: http://www.thesoaker.com/

“The Soaker” is a portable, self-contained and environmentally friendly wheel washing system. The system does not require city power or water connected to it which makes it highly portable.

“The Soaker” can be installed on job sites, dump sites and material pits to help keep the surrounding streets free of mud and dirt.

Its aluminum and stainless steel construction makes “The Soaker” environmentally friendly.

It features a high capacity main tank of 4000 gallons and a reserve tank of 2000 gallons. Its adjustable spray heads provide a low pressure/high volume water stream of up to 1000gpm. Motion sensors detect the vehicles on approach and turn on the pumps so the water spray is at full power by the time the vehicles go through the wheel wash.

“The Soaker” is manufactured to provide solutions to problems such as portability, road pollution, costly cleaning processes, fines and violations for depositing debris onto public highways, etc…

“The Soaker” can be rented on a monthly basis or purchased. A lease purchase option is also available. For more information about “The Soaker” wheel washing system, please call us at: (818) 952-6752 or email at: soakerinfo@thesoaker.com

May 6, 2020

Tire Wash Fail Part 2

Photo: David Jenkins

I took this photo of same project from a few posts ago, but at a different angle.

If this was my project, I would move the tire wash closer to the site exit, place asphalt treated base over the rock, and place construction fence or eco-blocks along the sides to prevent vehicles from dragging mud onto the exit.

May 1, 2020

Tire Wash Fail

Photo: David Jenkins

The photo is taken right at the paved road access to this project. It makes no sense to me why this tire wash is so far back into the site. The fact that the rock exit is so poorly installed and maintained makes it completely ineffective at preventing sediment trackout. i call this a tire wash fail.

November 18, 2020

The Problem with Hosing Tires

Photo: David Jenkins-Sheetflow Erosion Control
Photo: David Jenkins-Sheetflow Erosion Control

What is the problem with hosing tires? Water-specifically “Process Water”. Water that is used in a process, like hosing tires, is classified as process water and must be dealt with as though it is contaminated; because it is, with oil, grease, and various metals. So, if you are going to hose tires, you must plan to collect and dispose of the water legally. Legal disposal means a special processor for treatment and discharge or sanitary sewer.

August 20, 2019

Truck Being Loaded on Asphalt Keeps Tires Clean

If I’ve said it once, I must have said it 3 or 4 times: “Keep your tires clean!”. Who wants to use a tire wash and have to get rid of a whole lot of dirty water (process water) that can’t go down the storm drain? Save yourself some hassle and money. Give your employees a raise with the money you save.  Make sure your trucks are loaded when on asphalt.

 

Video: David Jenkins

November 4, 2018

How to Keep Construction Truck Tires Clean

So, you don’t want to use a tire wash, with all the costs and hassles associated with them…KEEP YOUR TIRES CLEAN and you won’t need one.

Here’s how:

 

Video: David Jenkins

June 1, 2014

How to Design and Install a Wheel Wash

How to Design and Install a Wheel Wash
By: Mark Kestner, Ph.D.

National Environmental Service Co., Inc.
7 Hampshire Drive, Mendham, NJ 07945 Tel: 973-543-4586 www.drdust.com
Presented at: California Mining Association Annual Meeting 2005, Squaw Valley, CA May 24-27

Introduction

Quarries, ready-mix plants, construction sites and other industrial facilities have become the
targets of new regulations designed to prevent track-out of mud, dust and dirt on to public roads. These
regulations have been developed primarily in response to Federal EPA actions that have designated many
metropolitan areas as “non-attainment” for their failure to comply with air quality standards for fine
particulate. Fine particulate, known as PM10 and fine respirable particulate, PM2.5, are now regarded as
the number one health hazard in urban environments. These particles are so small that they become
lodged in the aveoli of the lungs where they can cause or aggravate a variety of respiratory diseases
including asthma, emphysema and lung cancer.
Local governments in non-attainment areas are forced to take draconian measures to comply with
fine particulate standards or face the loss of federal highway funds. As a result, cities like Los Angeles
and Phoenix, have or are in the process of adopting rules that require affected facilities to install wheel
washes. The South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) in California, for example, has
recently passed Rule 1157 that will mandate the use of rumble grates and tire washes.
In other areas of the country, encroaching residential and commercial development around
industrial sites has led to an increased demand for wheel washes. Many companies, particularly stone
quarries, have installed wheel washes in order to get out in front of regulation and demonstrate their
willingness to be good neighbors. Other facilities are forced into compliance through fines and litigation.

Faced with state and local governments under the threat of federal action and a public unwilling
to tolerate any pollution, companies need to take a hard look at how best to respond. Because the costs of
pollution control equipment are difficult to recover, affected facilities have a real incentive to develop
affordable and effective technology to prevent carryout.
….MORE….

February 27, 2013

ACF West Wheel Wash

Nice tire wash!

ACF West Wheel Wash in Hillsboro, Oregon

ACF West Wheel Wash in Hillsboro, Oregon

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