Sheetflow Erosion Control Erosion Control for the CESCL

April 27, 2020

Cold Mix Asphalt Berm

Photo: David Jenkins

Cold mix asphalt berm works too. Used along the base of “jersey” barriers, high pH water from a concrete breaking operation is contained for later disposal off site.

April 24, 2020

Extruded Asphalt Berm

Photo: David Jenkins

Extruded asphalt berm at project entrance with center section “rolled” to allow trucks to enter and exit.

April 23, 2020

Extruded Asphalt Berm

Photo: David Jenkins

Another example of an extruded asphalt berm used to keep off site water from entering the work area.

April 22, 2020

Extruded Asphalt Berm

Photo: David Jenkins

We use extruded asphalt berms extensively to contain and direct site water to grass infield areas and to keep clean offsite water from entering the project. When the project is completed, the asphalt is removed and hauled to a batch plant for recycle.

April 21, 2020

Hot Mix Asphalt Berm

Photo: David Jenkins

The work area is the left. All runoff is diverted by silt fence and this hot mix asphalt berm to a sump, where it is pumped to a chitosan-enhanced sand filtration treatment system. This system prevented all turbid site water from entering the roadside ditch-outside of the silt fence-from draining to a creek. Note the mud on the left side of the berm and the clean asphalt on the right.

Since this is summer work and perimeter BMPs are containing all site runoff, we are not covering bare soil.

Upon completion and soil stabilization, the asphalt berm will be removed and hauled to an asphalt batch plant for recycle.

July 3, 2018

Barrier and Asphalt Berm

Barrier and Asphalt Berm – The more clean water you keep from flowing into your job site, the less dirty water you will have to manage. Placing a berm along the base of “Jersey Barrier” is one way to accomplish this.

Materials you can use include cold patch, extruded asphalt curbing, or sand bags.

Video: David Jenkins

November 27, 2020

Compost Berm

Filed under: Power Point — Sheetflow @ 1:51 am
Compost berm at perimeter of airport infield work on taxiway. Photo: David Jenkins
Compost berm at edge of asphalt before taxiway demolition. Photo: David Jenkins

We used to use silt fence when we did construction on the airfield. More and more we are using compost berms. The airfield grades are very small, maybe 20:1.

Compost berms can contain bare soil areas, filtering turbid water. When complete, we spread the compost and hydroseeded.

September 25, 2020

Gravel Berm

Photo: David Jenkins

When we rebuilt this road, we had the contractor blade the gravel base course into a berm along the edge. This created a berm to project the bare area on the left from erosion caused by runoff from the roadway.

The gravel berm was bladed smooth just before installing a curb along the edge of the road. The bare soil was hydroseeded with bonded fiber matrix.

By using the gravel in this way, we avoided installing silt fence, preventing the soil disturbance that causes and keeping a bunch of plastic out of the landfill at the end of the project.

September 17, 2020

Compost Sock Catch Basin Berm

Photo: David Jenkins

This compost sock catch basin berm works well as it is heavy enough to stick to the asphalt. Note the tear and I would keep an eye on it during inspections.

September 9, 2020

Berm for Quarry Spalls

Quarry Spalls. Photo: David Jenkins

This would not have been my choice as a berm for quarry spalls; straw wattles are too light to use on asphalt and they allow water to flow under them. A compost sock, being heavy, would work better, though, they are prone to tearing. An asphalt berm might be best here.

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