Sheetflow Erosion Control Erosion Control for CESCL's

April 27, 2020

Cold Mix Asphalt Berm

Photo: David Jenkins

Cold mix asphalt berm works too. Used along the base of “jersey” barriers, high pH water from a concrete breaking operation is contained for later disposal off site.

April 24, 2020

Extruded Asphalt Berm

Photo: David Jenkins

Extruded asphalt berm at project entrance with center section “rolled” to allow trucks to enter and exit.

April 23, 2020

Extruded Asphalt Berm

Photo: David Jenkins

Another example of an extruded asphalt berm used to keep off site water from entering the work area.

April 22, 2020

Extruded Asphalt Berm

Photo: David Jenkins

We use extruded asphalt berms extensively to contain and direct site water to grass infield areas and to keep clean offsite water from entering the project. When the project is completed, the asphalt is removed and hauled to a batch plant for recycle.

April 21, 2020

Hot Mix Asphalt Berm

Photo: David Jenkins

The work area is the left. All runoff is diverted by silt fence and this hot mix asphalt berm to a sump, where it is pumped to a chitosan-enhanced sand filtration treatment system. This system prevented all turbid site water from entering the roadside ditch-outside of the silt fence-from draining to a creek. Note the mud on the left side of the berm and the clean asphalt on the right.

Since this is summer work and perimeter BMPs are containing all site runoff, we are not covering bare soil.

Upon completion and soil stabilization, the asphalt berm will be removed and hauled to an asphalt batch plant for recycle.

July 3, 2018

Barrier and Asphalt Berm

Barrier and Asphalt Berm – The more clean water you keep from flowing into your job site, the less dirty water you will have to manage. Placing a berm along the base of “Jersey Barrier” is one way to accomplish this.

Materials you can use include cold patch, extruded asphalt curbing, or sand bags.

Video: David Jenkins

September 17, 2020

Compost Sock Catch Basin Berm

Photo: David Jenkins

This compost sock catch basin berm works well as it is heavy enough to stick to the asphalt. Note the tear and I would keep an eye on it during inspections.

September 9, 2020

Berm for Quarry Spalls

Quarry Spalls. Photo: David Jenkins

This would not have been my choice as a berm for quarry spalls; straw wattles are too light to use on asphalt and they allow water to flow under them. A compost sock, being heavy, would work better, though, they are prone to tearing. An asphalt berm might be best here.

July 6, 2020

Perimeter Control BMPs

Photo: David Jenkins

The contractor is using silt fence and an asphalt berm as perimeter control BMPs. They are containing all sediment and water within the project. When it rains, the contractor pumps stormwater runoff to an on-site treatment system, which uses chitosan-enhanced sand filtration.

March 27, 2020

Triangular Silt Dike Construction Entrance

Photo: David Jenkins

We had two goals: (1) keep dirty site water from draining off site and into the existing storm system; (2) allow access to the project for deliveries. Working together with the contractor, we decided that an asphalt berm alone wouldn’t provide enough protection and if installed thick enough to provide protection, wouldn’t allow for trucks to access the site. We also knew that Triangular Silt Dikes (TSDs) could be driven over but would tend to move if not secured to the existing asphalt. Solution: use both; TSDs to provide adequate protection from site discharges and the asphalt berm to secure the TSD flap to the existing asphalt. This worked well and required little maintenance.

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