Sheetflow Erosion Control Erosion Control for the CESCL

September 24, 2020

Biodegradable Erosion Control BMPs: Burlap Fence Compost Sock

Video: David Jenkins

Biodegradable Erosion Control BMPs: Burlap Fence Compost Sock

My goal was 100% biodegradable BMPs on this habitat restoration project. In this video I show the burlap silt fence and the compost socks.

November 17, 2020

Silt Fence Here?

Photo: David Jenkins

Would I put silt fence here? I would not. The work involves installing an 8 inch ductile water line to a property up the hill. The connection to service is at the left orange cone. The other orange cones are located on the backfilled excavation. I would have specified a gravel berm, asphalt berm, burlap fence, orange construction fence, or a combination.

November 10, 2020

What’s Wrong with this Photo?

Photo: David Jenkins-Sheetflow Erosion Control

What’s wrong with this photo? On first glance, it looks like a peaceful pathway across a stormwater swale. In reality, it is two compost socks that need to be overlapped and one burlap silt fence that needs maintenance.

March 23, 2020

Old Silt Fence

22 year-old silt fence. Photo: David Jenkins

This fence was installed when a storage facility was constructed behind my house. My kids were preschoolers; now they are college age. Why was this installed since everything is level? Why was it never removed? Was this the right choice for a perimeter control BMP? Silt fence is the “go-to” perimeter control. Should it be? There are so many options available: Forest duff and vegetation berm, burlap silt fence with wooden stakes, compost berm, straw wattles, all of which could be left in place to biodegrade after the project is completed.

July 2, 2019

Biofence Specification

I am trying to get to 100% biodegradable, recycled, reusable, recyclable, low impact best management practices.  I have used burlap fabric fence several times.  I use it whenever I can leave it in place to degrade, like on habitat or wetland work. 

Biofence Specification

Materials
BIOFENCE
A. Biofence shall consist of 7 ounce or heavier uncoated burlap fabric at least 36 inches wide and 100 feet long. Wood stakes dimensions shall be a minimum 1 1/8 x 11/8 inches by 42 inches high.

Construction Requirements
 BIOFENCE
a. Stakes shall be driven into the ground a minimum of 12 inches and be spaced no more than 6 feet apart.
b. Fence ends shall be joined by wrapping ends together around a post 3 times and driven into the ground.
c. Burlap fabric shall be attached to the post in at least 3 places using staples or other method approved by the Engineer.
d. When used as a barrier fence, fabric shall not be trenched into the ground. When used as a silt fence, a minimum 8 inch flap shall be left at the bottom and held in place with straw wattles staked in as detailed in item 9 above.

Payment
C. Payment for “TESC – Biofence” will be made at the contract unit price per linear foot as stated in the Schedule of Unit Prices and shall be full compensation for furnishing all labor, equipment, materials and tools necessary to complete the installation of the biofence as detailed on the drawings or as directed by the Engineer and specified herein. The unit price shall include all maintenance, the removal of biofence, and restoration of the area at the completion of the work

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