Sheet Flow Construction Erosion Control

November 26, 2020

Why Perimeter Controls?

Filed under: Power Point — Tags: , , , — Sheetflow @ 1:43 am
Presentation: David Jenkins

Why are perimeter controls necessary? Here are few reasons: keep clean water out of your project and keep dirty water and sediment in your project.

November 25, 2020

Non-Standard Perimeter Controls

Filed under: Power Point — Tags: , , , — Sheetflow @ 1:33 pm
Presentation: David Jenkins

Last month, I did a presentation on non- standard perimeter controls. These are controls other than silt fence, which is the standard perimeter control on construction projects.

While silt fence is the appropriate perimeter control in many situations, (the bottom of a slope), it is inappropriate is so many other situations.

Over the next few weeks, I will post the presentation slides and talk about some of the non-standard controls.

October 21, 2020

Perimeter Controls Presentation

I am giving a presentation on Perimeter Controls: Non-standard Practices for Managing Water and Sediment today at noon. Go to Erosion and Sediment Control Association- British Columbia for information and to sign up. It’s only 10 bucks.

Description-Silt fence is not the only perimeter control BMP option. It is not the best option in many situations. In this presentation, I will discuss when silt fence makes sense, when it doesn’t, what other options are available.

September 29, 2020

Sod Berm Perimeter BMP

Photo: David Jenkins

This is not one of my projects but we have used this method on occasion. Why install silt fence when you can create a sod berm perimeter BMP?

In this case, the area is small and it is surrounded by vegetation so the risk of erosion and turbid runoff is low. In addition, the sod is full roots and seeds so it will regrow in place, providing additional erosion prevention.

August 17, 2020

Adaptive Management-Perimeter BMPs

There is a difference between the paper erosion plan and what the project looks like in the field. I wrote up the plan to manage water from offsite. Now that I am looking at the area, I might need to re-think the plan. Erosion control adaptive management is what makes the plan come to fruition. Video: David Jenkins-Sheetflow

This video gives an example of adaptive management for perimeter erosion control BMPs.

Transcript:

This is our staging area for our project we are going to be starting up back over in here on the other side of a stormwater swale. We have to access the site through another owner’s property and they have allowed us to have this staging area.

My plan was to have an extruded asphalt curb along this edge to take all the stormwater running off the parking lot coming this way and keep it out of the staging area, but that’s going to concentrate all the water from back up to the left into one location there down by the equipment.

Another BMP we’re using is compost socks on the edge of the swale to take any sheet flow from the staging area here and spread it out before it goes into the swale. Here are the compost socks and a bunch more here waiting for installation.

The idea of concentrating all the water and dumping it into the swale in one spot down here, maybe its better with the compost sock to just let everything just sheet flow and spread out against the sock and then dribble in, and actually in this area its not going right into the swale its going into some landscape across the pathway and then into the swale so maybe it’s a combination.

Actually, come to think of it, maybe on this end of the project no curbing and back over in here we put curbing in. This is all pretty protected so you know, this is adaptive management, this is how these things go you do the erosion plan write it up on a plan sheet and then you walk the site and see how things are in reality and should be willing to change.

Okay from here now from this pathway over we are going right into the swale so maybe we start the curbing maybe off this island. You see were gong into the swale now and this is going to be the most intensively used area for staging so maybe we start with a short, extruded asphalt curb over there and let everything else sheetflow back in here.

Okay got to think on this.

July 28, 2020

Compost Sock Perimeter BMP

Photo: David Jenkins

The Compost sock perimeter BMP works better than straw wattles on asphalt as they are heavier and make better surface contact.

July 6, 2020

Perimeter Control BMPs

Photo: David Jenkins

The contractor is using silt fence and an asphalt berm as perimeter control BMPs. They are containing all sediment and water within the project. When it rains, the contractor pumps stormwater runoff to an on-site treatment system, which uses chitosan-enhanced sand filtration.

November 30, 2020

Compost Socks

Filed under: Power Point — Tags: , , , , — Sheetflow @ 1:53 am

As I have written in previous posts, compost socks make excellent perimeter berms, especially when used on impervious surfaces. Make sure to overlap the ends and don’t drive over them. Recycle the compost when done.

Presentation: David Jenkins
Presentation: David Jenkins

November 27, 2020

Compost Berm

Filed under: Power Point — Tags: , , , , — Sheetflow @ 1:51 am
Compost berm at perimeter of airport infield work on taxiway. Photo: David Jenkins
Compost berm at edge of asphalt before taxiway demolition. Photo: David Jenkins

We used to use silt fence when we did construction on the airfield. More and more we are using compost berms. The airfield grades are very small, maybe 20:1.

Compost berms can contain bare soil areas, filtering turbid water. When complete, we spread the compost and hydroseeded.

September 27, 2020

Erosion Control Photos

Filed under: — Sheetflow @ 3:49 pm

All photos may be used for teaching and training purposes with attribution to: David Jenkins, sheetflow.com

Photos may not be used for commercial purposes without prior express permission from David Jenkins, sheetflow.com

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