Sheetflow Erosion Control Erosion Control for the CESCL

October 8, 2020

Planning Ahead

Filed under: Video — Tags: , , , , , , , — Sheetflow @ 3:40 am

Planning ahead requires a different mindset to prevent problems rather than react when they happen.

On this project we are using the neighboring property for staging; all of the runoff drains into their constructed stormwater treatment swale.

Their stormwater discharges are regulated and any non-compliance issues could be attributed to the contractor’s use of this area.

Video: David Jenkins

August 17, 2020

Adaptive Management-Perimeter BMPs

There is a difference between the paper erosion plan and what the project looks like in the field. I wrote up the plan to manage water from offsite. Now that I am looking at the area, I might need to re-think the plan. Erosion control adaptive management is what makes the plan come to fruition. Video: David Jenkins-Sheetflow

This video gives an example of adaptive management for perimeter erosion control BMPs.

Transcript:

This is our staging area for our project we are going to be starting up back over in here on the other side of a stormwater swale. We have to access the site through another owner’s property and they have allowed us to have this staging area.

My plan was to have an extruded asphalt curb along this edge to take all the stormwater running off the parking lot coming this way and keep it out of the staging area, but that’s going to concentrate all the water from back up to the left into one location there down by the equipment.

Another BMP we’re using is compost socks on the edge of the swale to take any sheet flow from the staging area here and spread it out before it goes into the swale. Here are the compost socks and a bunch more here waiting for installation.

The idea of concentrating all the water and dumping it into the swale in one spot down here, maybe its better with the compost sock to just let everything just sheet flow and spread out against the sock and then dribble in, and actually in this area its not going right into the swale its going into some landscape across the pathway and then into the swale so maybe it’s a combination.

Actually, come to think of it, maybe on this end of the project no curbing and back over in here we put curbing in. This is all pretty protected so you know, this is adaptive management, this is how these things go you do the erosion plan write it up on a plan sheet and then you walk the site and see how things are in reality and should be willing to change.

Okay from here now from this pathway over we are going right into the swale so maybe we start the curbing maybe off this island. You see were gong into the swale now and this is going to be the most intensively used area for staging so maybe we start with a short, extruded asphalt curb over there and let everything else sheetflow back in here.

Okay got to think on this.

January 14, 2020

Where’s the Rock Entrance?

Photo: David Jenkins

Where’s the rock entrance? I am just glad it’s not my project. This is a small staging area for a bike path extension next to a creek. All dirty runoff ends up in the creek. There used to be a rock entrance, but with mud being tracked over it, it has disappeared. With a small staging area and rainy season work next to a creek, I would have specified that the entire staging area be covered with Asphalt Treated Base (ATB), to be removed and recycled at the end of the job. I have done this on several staging areas of up to about two acres. This can end up being much less expensive than managing tire washes and sweepers.

December 31, 2010

Construction Erosion Control Inspection-Part 1

Inspecting construction erosion control on a small construction project staging area using the following best management practices: silt fence, plastic covering, stabilized construction entrance, straw wattle, straw mulch and asphalt berm.

 

Video: David Jenkins

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