Sheetflow Erosion Control Erosion Control for the CESCL

December 10, 2019

Creative Contractor Makes Slope Tracking Excavator Bucket

Leave it to the creative contractor to come up with creative solutions. Confronted with a small, steep slope and wet soil, the contractor didn’t want to risk walking a small caterpiller up and down to roughen it before hydroseeding. Using some angle iron and an excavator bucket, they welded up a slope tracker. The operator tamps the slope with the bucket just like they are compacting the slope. This is the result.

 

Video: David Jenkins

April 2, 2020

Muddy Puddle Inside the Project

Photo: David Jenkins

Is a muddy puddle a problem if it is completely contained inside the project boundary? Unless vehicles are driving through this and tracking mud outside of the project, I don’t consider it a problem and would only caution the contractor to watch out for trackout.

March 1, 2019

Prevent Sediment Trackout

Managing Construction Projects to Prevent Sediment Trackout – I originally submitted this abstract for the 2019 IECA Denver conference . It was not accepted as a presentation but as an article in the October 2018 edition “Environmental Connection Magazine”.

Abstract
Sediment tracking from construction sites onto public roads and highways is a continual source or frustration for both regulators and contractors. The standard best management practices (BMPs) available, such as stabilized construction entrances and sweepers, often don’t work at all and, at best, only reduce total sediment by 30-50% which is inadequate for preventing water quality violations. In addition to water quality problems, sediment tracking onto roadways can generate dust, which may violate clean air standards and cause unsafe conditions, especially on highways.
This paper will discuss BMPs, methods, and procedures, which can be used by contractors to prevent sediment from being tracked onto roadways in the first place. In addition, ways to significantly reduce sediment loss will be presented. Some of these methods include:

• Passive tire baths
• Various tire washes
• Keeping vehicles of dirt
• Vacuum vs. mechanical sweepers
• Road washing
• Contract specifications

Each method will be discussed with pros and cons, design information and contract specifications.

The full magazine can be found at:
Environmental Connection, October/November 2018, Volume 13, Issue 4.

The article is attached below:

June 16, 2016

Paying for TESC

The Best Way to Measure and Pay for TESC in Public Works Contracts

It is a big mistake to make temporary erosion and sediment an “incidental” item in a public works contract. Anything that can be measured should be and set up as a Unit Price item. Planning and Implementation can be lump sum but measurement and payment must be clearly specified. Force Account is set up for unforeseen conditions; the amount is set by the owner so that everyone bids the same number. Make clear at the pre-bid meeting that the Lump Sum bid for planning and implementation covers lots of stuff and they need to bid accordingly. Here is an example of the best way to pay: (more…)

June 25, 2015

Low Impact Construction

Low Impact Development for Public Works Construction:
Erosion and Sediment Control Compliance

David S. Jenkins, Seattle, Washington

Introduction
Construction is a messy business; in the Puget Sound region of western Washington, with average annual rainfall of 40″ to 60″, it can also be challenging. Uncontrolled erosion from a construction site can generate 10-1000 times the quantity of sediment that occurs naturally from vegetated areas. Most construction in western Washington occurs near wetlands, streams, lakes, or the Puget Sound where sediment loss can reduce beneficial uses, or worse, destroy a salmon stream.

This paper will discuss proven methods that public works professionals can utilise to improve erosion control compliance and reduce project impacts.
(more…)

September 19, 2013

Lessons in Solving Big Weather-Related Problems

Grading and Excavation Contractor
September-October 2003

Lessons in Solving Big Weather-Related Problems

When it comes to controlling erosion and sediment in bad weather, construction of a third runway at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, near Seattle, WA, qualifies as a genuine challenge. Providing a foundation for the 8,500-ft.-long, 150-ft.-wide runway in the hilly terrain will require an estimated 17 million yd.3 of fill. Since construction began in 1997, about 5 million yd.3 have been placed. It will take a large fleet of dump trucks, running 20 hours a day, three and a half years to bring in the rest. Then there’s all that wet weather the area is famous for, especially in late fall and winter. Two years ago, for example, the project was drenched with about 5 in. of wind-driven rain in one 36-hour period. (more…)

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