Sheetflow Erosion Control Erosion Control for the CESCL

October 20, 2020

Steel Plates Trackout

Video: David Jenkins-Sheetflow Erosion Control

Trackout happens when you back trucks off of the steel plates onto dirt to unload materials. The plan was for trucks to stay on plates, back to the end and dump. The excavator was to move the materials around the site. There is no tire wash on this project as there isn’t room, so staying on the plates is required and necessary. The trackout is onto the neighbors parking lot, our only site access, and they don’t appreciate dirt ending up in their stormwater swale when the rains come.

October 15, 2020

Sediment Trackout Happens

Sediment trackout happens when you back trucks off of the steel plates onto dirt to unload materials. The plan was for trucks to stay on plates, back to the end and dump.

The excavator was to move the materials around the site. There is no tire wash on this project as there isn’t room, so staying on the plates is required and necessary. The trackout is onto the neighbors parking lot, our only site access, and they don’t appreciate dirt ending up in their stormwater swale when the rains come.

Video: David Jenkins-Sheetflow Erosion Control

June 24, 2020

Silt Fence and Trackout Fail Part 2

This is a follow up to Silt Fence and Trackout Fail post from April 6, 2020. Same old !@#$, different month.

Photo: David Jenkins
Photo: David Jenkins

May 28, 2020

Prevented Trackout

Photo: David Jenkins

We prevented trackout by placing grizzlies from the road back into the site. Truck drivers backed up to the steel plate near the excavator and dumped their loads. The excavator operator moved the material into the proper piles. The truck tires came in clean, stayed clean on the grizzlies and left clean. With thought and planning, we didn’t need to install a tire wash.

May 27, 2020

Preventable Trackout

Photo: David Jenkins

This trackout was preventable. Asphalt was removed by the contractor to work on the new building foundation; the driveway asphalt was left in place, which is good. Gravel base course was delivered to be placed under the concrete slab.

Instead of backing all of the way into the site, over wet dirt, the trucks could have stayed on the asphalt driveway to unload. Site equipment could have been used to move the gravel.

The contractor could also have dumped gravel next to the asphalt, then graded it back into the site to provide a construction access into the site. In this way, the delivery truck could have stayed on gravel rather than driving on dirt.

While this is not a lot of dirt on the road, it does add up and is a magnet for inspectors and regulators to visit the site.

April 6, 2020

Silt Fence and Trackout Fail

Photo: David Jenkins

I was just minding my own business last Friday, driving from Fred Meyer to the UPS store and passed this project. I told my wife I have to get a photo; she says okay since she knows me and my habit of stopping to take TESC photos.

I made a u -turn at the Wal Mart, drove back a block and stopped in the middle of the street to get this shot.

There is so much wrong here, where do I start? Clearly, dirt is tracked off of the project in the background, as you can see the sediment build up in the curb line. Someone told someone to put something in the swale to keep dirt out, then someone else installed this silt fence.

First off, silt fence needs to be trenched in and this just has a few rocks placed on the flap.

Second, they probably couldn’t trench this in anyway without tearing up the drainage swale.

Third, only two of the three curb cuts are backed by the silt fence.

Fourth, silt fence is a barrier, not a filter, and with the volume of water draining off the asphalt during a rain event, dirty water would just blow around and under the silt fence.

Conclusion, silt fence is never used in a water flow situation; it is only to contain eroded sediment from a sloped area. A better BMP here is a compost berm or something similar that would allow some water to pass but filter some sediment. Sand bags would work to keep everything out of the swale but then the dirty water would bypass to the next catch basin, which probably has a catch basin insert, which would collect sand and such but would not do anything for turbidity. So, what is the best BMP? Stop the !@#$ ing trackout in the first place!

February 20, 2020

Just a Little Trackout

Video: David Jenkins

Just a little trackout over time becomes a water quality non-compliance issue.

July 30, 2019

Sediment Trackout Fail

Photo: Dave Jenkins

I’m not a big fan of the “Grizzly” method of trackout prevention. My standard is “No visible trackout” and these have never met that standard. Preventing tires from getting dirty in the first place is still the best BMP! This is a trackout fail.

March 1, 2019

Prevent Sediment Trackout

Managing Construction Projects to Prevent Sediment Trackout – I originally submitted this abstract for the 2019 IECA Denver conference . It was not accepted as a presentation but as an article in the October 2018 edition “Environmental Connection Magazine”.

Abstract
Sediment tracking from construction sites onto public roads and highways is a continual source or frustration for both regulators and contractors. The standard best management practices (BMPs) available, such as stabilized construction entrances and sweepers, often don’t work at all and, at best, only reduce total sediment by 30-50% which is inadequate for preventing water quality violations. In addition to water quality problems, sediment tracking onto roadways can generate dust, which may violate clean air standards and cause unsafe conditions, especially on highways.
This paper will discuss BMPs, methods, and procedures, which can be used by contractors to prevent sediment from being tracked onto roadways in the first place. In addition, ways to significantly reduce sediment loss will be presented. Some of these methods include:

• Passive tire baths
• Various tire washes
• Keeping vehicles of dirt
• Vacuum vs. mechanical sweepers
• Road washing
• Contract specifications

Each method will be discussed with pros and cons, design information and contract specifications.

The full magazine can be found at:
Environmental Connection, October/November 2018, Volume 13, Issue 4.

The article is attached below:

December 8, 2020

Curb and Gutter Berms

Filed under: Power Point — Sheetflow @ 2:11 am

I encourage contractors to install curb and gutters to function as berms, as soon as possible. This contractor also installed the first lift of asphalt over gravel base course to provide a stable work surface. This provides a clean work surface and prevents sediment trackout. The projects shown are the SeaTac FAA Tracon facility and the SeaTac South Terminal Expansion Project.

Presentation: David Jenkins-Sheetflow Erosion Control
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