Sheetflow Erosion Control Erosion Control for the CESCL

January 25, 2021

Turbidity/TSS and BMPs

Filed under: Uncategorized — Sheetflow @ 7:09 am

January 22, 2021

The Turbidity/TSS Problem

Filed under: Uncategorized — Sheetflow @ 7:07 am

October 29, 2020

Turbidity Barrier

This is a turbidity barrier, also known as a turbidity curtain. We are using it to contain sediment during a riverbank restoration project.

Photo: David Jenkins-Sheetflow Erosion Control
Photo: David Jenkins-Sheetflow Erosion Control

October 7, 2020

Turbidity Curtain Protection

Filed under: Uncategorized — Sheetflow @ 3:45 am
Photo: David Jenkins

While working this riverbank habitat restoration project, we rely on a turbidity curtain protection to contain turbid water.

May 7, 2020

Turbidity 1-25-250 NTUs

Photo: David Jenkins

The sample on the left is just under 1 NTU, the middle is 25 NTUs, and the one on the right is 250 NTUs. In Washington state, the Construction Storm Water General NPDES Permit lists benchmarks that construction discharges must meet. These are: 0-25 NTUs everything is cool; 26 -249 NTUs not so good, upgrade your site best management practices (BMPs) and modify your SWPPP; 250 NTUs and above, call the Dept. of Ecology, upgrade BMPs, modify the SWPPP and monitor the water body that the project discharges to until you are in compliance.

February 25, 2020

Construction Erosion Inspection-Turbid Discharge

6000 NTUs Photo: David Jenkins

My construction erosion inspection turned up a turbid discharge. A little bit of sediment track out each day builds up. The contractor was vacuum sweeping this area on a regular basis but the first rain shows how effective that was. I measured this discharge at 6000 nephelometric turbidity units (NTUs) using an old Hach 2100P turbidimeter. This meter only reads up to 1000 NTUs, so I had to dilute the sample 3 times to determine the actual reading.

January 28, 2020

Full Depth Turbidity Curtain

Photo: David Jenkins

If there was any doubt that turbidity curtains work…

March 21, 2017

Turbidity Reduction Techniques

International Erosion Control Association (IECA)Webinar

Turbidity Reduction Techniques for Pumping Operations on Construction Sites




Have you ever sampled and measured turbidity numeric levels for pumping or dewatering operations on your construction site? How turbid is your discharge from your work zone while working on a borrow site or pipe culvert near a stream? Will your discharge meet effluent limits prior to entering jurisdictional waters? This webinar will cover a number of techniques to reduce turbidity levels from pumped effluent. Learn about new technologies, design strategies, and case studies to maintain water quality near your construction operation.

Instructor: Ted Sherrod, PE, CPESC, CPSWQ
Date: March 23rd,2011 noon central time
PDH: 1
One certificate is issued (to the registered participant), per paid registration.

Members: $50
Non-Members: $65

Have you ever sampled and measured turbidity numeric levels for pumping or dewatering operations on your construction site? How turbid is your discharge from your work zone while working on a borrow site or pipe culvert near a stream? Will your discharge meet effluent limits prior to entering jurisdictional waters? This webinar will cover a number of techniques to reduce turbidity levels from pumped effluent. Learn about new technologies, design strategies, and case studies to maintain water quality near your construction operation.

For additional information, contact:

IECA
Holly Nicholson
Phone: 303-640-7554
Fax: 866-308-3087
Email: holly@ieca.org

December 30, 2011

Pumping to Dirt Bag Doesn’t Reduce Turbidity of the Water

I know, great name for an erosion and sediment control product, right? Dirt bags work great if you are trying to reduce the total amount of sediment being discharged from a project. But, if you have to reduce the turbidity of the water to meet water quality standards, this won’t do it.

 

Video: David Jenkins

August 19, 2011

Calibrate a Turbidity Meter

This video by the Washington Stormwater Center, demonstrates how to use and calibrate a turbidity meter, as well with how to set up a water sample for reading, and how to record the results.

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