Sheetflow Erosion Control Erosion Control for CESCL's

September 17, 2020

Compost Sock Catch Basin Berm

Photo: David Jenkins

This compost sock catch basin berm works well as it is heavy enough to stick to the asphalt. Note the tear and I would keep an eye on it during inspections.

September 9, 2020

Berm for Quarry Spalls

Quarry Spalls. Photo: David Jenkins

This would not have been my choice as a berm for quarry spalls; straw wattles are too light to use on asphalt and they allow water to flow under them. A compost sock, being heavy, would work better, though, they are prone to tearing. An asphalt berm might be best here.

August 24, 2020

Construction Access with Steel Plates

We built a construction access with steel plates across this stormwater swale. Then we laid compost socks and straw wattles along side of the eco blocks placed along the edges.

The adjacent parking lot drains into the swale and must be protected from dirty construction stormwater discharges.

August 17, 2020

Adaptive Management-Perimeter BMPs

There is a difference between the paper erosion plan and what the project looks like in the field. I wrote up the plan to manage water from offsite. Now that I am looking at the area, I might need to re-think the plan. Erosion control adaptive management is what makes the plan come to fruition. Video: David Jenkins-Sheetflow

This video gives an example of adaptive management for perimeter erosion control BMPs.

Transcript:

This is our staging area for our project we are going to be starting up back over in here on the other side of a stormwater swale. We have to access the site through another owner’s property and they have allowed us to have this staging area.

My plan was to have an extruded asphalt curb along this edge to take all the stormwater running off the parking lot coming this way and keep it out of the staging area, but that’s going to concentrate all the water from back up to the left into one location there down by the equipment.

Another BMP we’re using is compost socks on the edge of the swale to take any sheet flow from the staging area here and spread it out before it goes into the swale. Here are the compost socks and a bunch more here waiting for installation.

The idea of concentrating all the water and dumping it into the swale in one spot down here, maybe its better with the compost sock to just let everything just sheet flow and spread out against the sock and then dribble in, and actually in this area its not going right into the swale its going into some landscape across the pathway and then into the swale so maybe it’s a combination.

Actually, come to think of it, maybe on this end of the project no curbing and back over in here we put curbing in. This is all pretty protected so you know, this is adaptive management, this is how these things go you do the erosion plan write it up on a plan sheet and then you walk the site and see how things are in reality and should be willing to change.

Okay from here now from this pathway over we are going right into the swale so maybe we start the curbing maybe off this island. You see were gong into the swale now and this is going to be the most intensively used area for staging so maybe we start with a short, extruded asphalt curb over there and let everything else sheetflow back in here.

Okay got to think on this.

January 13, 2020

A Little Wind Overnight

Photo: David Jenkins

The fence went over just like dominos. At least the compost berm stayed in place.

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