Sheetflow Erosion Control Erosion Control for the CESCL

November 17, 2020

Silt Fence Here?

Photo: David Jenkins

Would I put silt fence here? I would not. The work involves installing an 8 inch ductile water line to a property up the hill. The connection to service is at the left orange cone. The other orange cones are located on the backfilled excavation. I would have specified a gravel berm, asphalt berm, burlap fence, orange construction fence, or a combination.

November 4, 2020

Silt Fence Inspection

Filed under: Photo — Tags: , , , , , , — Sheetflow @ 6:53 am
Photo: David Jenkins-Sheetflow Erosion Control

This silt fence looks pretty ugly and inspection shows it certainly needs maintenance; but does it? The silt fence made sense before we excavated several feet, now it doesn’t. There is a turbidity curtain in the river to the right and the contractor is careful to pull material back from the riverbank. I am going to let this go.

October 26, 2020

Temporary Boot Wash

We were excavating a riverbank next to a former Superfund cleanup site and we hit a layer of black soil. I stopped the work and called out an Environmental Agent (EA). The EA took samples of the soil and sent them to a lab for analysis. I had the contractor rope off the area and build a temporary boot wash at the site entrance. It turned out the soil was clean.

December 3, 2019

Construction Erosion Inspection-Trench Excavation Asphalt Kept Clean

Dirt from trench excavation loaded into front loader bucket and hauled to stockpile, or dirt side cast onto asphalt: which is cheaper? How about no sweeper needed, no dirty water going down the drain, asphalt kept clean?  I go with the first answer.

 

Video: David Jenkins

May 27, 2011

Excavation for Conduit-Dirt On Wrong Side

It looks to me that the dirt might be on the wrong side.  Or maybe not, as it keeps the runoff out and saves grass from being covered with dirt.  It should be covered with plastic.

February 25, 2011

Construction Stormwater General Permit

Construction Stormwater General Permit

Construction site operators are required to be covered by a Construction Stormwater General Permit if they are engaged in clearing, grading, and excavating activities that disturb one or more acres and discharge stormwater to surface waters of the state. Smaller sites may also require coverage if they are part of a larger common plan of development that will ultimately disturb one acre or more. Operators of regulated construction sites are required to:

  • Develop stormwater pollution prevention plans.
  • Implement sediment, erosion, and pollution prevention control measures.
  • Obtain coverage under this permit.

NEW! - 01/29/09 Ecology issues the Construction Stormwater General Permit December 1, 2010

WebDMRs and PARIS

Contact Us – Contact your Permit Administrator for permit assistance or your Regional Office for site specific questions.

Permit, Forms and Application – Permit, application, forms, and appeal information.

High Turbidity Reporting – Construction projects must report high stormwater turbidity results within 24 hours.  If you get a high result, call your Ecology regional office.

Resources and Guidance – DMRs, Stormwater monitoring,  manuals, 303(d) list information.

CESCL Training and Certification Programs

Historical Information – Pollution Control Hearing Board information, public comments.

Construction Stormwater General Permit.

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