Sheetflow Construction Erosion and Sediment Control

May 15, 2020

Guide to Handling Fugitive Dust from Construction Projects

Download: Guide to Handling Fugitive Dust from Construction Projects.PDF

The classic brochure developed in 1997 by the Associated General Contractors (AGC) of Washington Education Foundation and the Fugitive Dust Task Force, Seattle, Washington. Updated and edited for the Internet by: www.sheetflow.com, February 2009.

April 20, 2020

Environmentally Friendly, Biodegradable, Re-usable, and Recyclable Erosion and Sediment Control BMPs

This is an article I wrote for the April-May 2020 “Environmental Connections” magazine of the International Erosion Control Assn.  It starts on page 26.

Environmentally Friendly, Biodegradable, Re-usable, and Recyclable Erosion and Sediment Control BMPs

David Jenkins, CPESC

Erosion Control/Stormwater Engineer, Port of Seattle

Background

We have all seen silt fence left in place years after a project is completed, heard of birds and reptiles trapped in erosion blanket netting even after the straw and coconut mulch has biodegraded (1), and know of catch basin inserts and silt fence landfilled at the end of a project.

In 2015, the Port of Seattle (Port) rebuilt the center runway at Sea-Tac International Airport.  Silt fence was installed on the project perimeter-a total of nearly four miles.  Recyclers would not take the used fence and it ended up in a landfill. (2)

The Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) keeps records of the total planned quantity of materials used on projects. From February 1, 2000 to February 1, 2020, the total planned quantity of silt fence used on WSDOT projects was 1,826,160 linear feet, or about 345 miles. Installed on both sides of Interstate 5, that quantity would run from Seattle, Washington to Portland, Oregon.  Based on my experience, the silt fence fabric likely ended up in a landfill or was left in place. (3)

The following are some means, methods, procedures and best management practices available to reduce the overall environmental impact of your construction projects. (more…)

Download: Environmental Connections, April-May 2020

Plastic mesh from straw wattle, five years after installation. Photo: David Jenkins

April 15, 2020

Guide to Handling Fugitive Dust from Construction Projects

Download: Guide to Handling Fugitive Dust from Construction Projects.PDF

The classic brochure developed in 1997 by the Associated General Contractors (AGC) of Washington Education Foundation and the Fugitive Dust Task Force, Seattle, Washington. Updated and edited for the Internet by: www.sheetflow.com, February 2009.

January 20, 2020

Water Spray Dust Control

May 14, 2019

Guide to Handling Fugitive Dust from Construction Projects

Download: Guide to Handling Fugitive Dust from Construction Projects.PDF

The classic brochure developed in 1997 by the Associated General Contractors (AGC) of Washington Education Foundation and the Fugitive Dust Task Force, Seattle, Washington. Updated and edited for the Internet by: www.sheetflow.com, February 2009.

November 14, 2017

Guide to Handling Fugitive Dust from Construction Projects

Download: Guide to Handling Fugitive Dust from Construction Projects.PDF

The classic brochure developed in 1997 by the Associated General Contractors (AGC) of Washington Education Foundation and the Fugitive Dust Task Force, Seattle, Washington. Updated and edited for the Internet by: www.sheetflow.com, February 2009.

February 18, 2017

Fugitive Dust Control for Heavy Equipment Operators

Graders and Scrapers

  • Use water truck or sprinklers to moisten soils before grading.
  • Minimize areas of clearing and grubbing to a manageable size.
  • Minimize time frames between Fugitive Dust-creating activities and final solutions (ex., roadway excavation and paving).
  • Avoid activity during high winds.

 

Front-End Loaders and Backhoes

  • Use water truck to keep soils moist.
  • Use water sprays when dumping soils into haul trucks.
  • Minimize drop height.
  • Avoid activity during high winds.

FROM: Guide to Handling Fugitive Dust from Construction Projects, AGC of WA Ed. Foundation. 1997

MODIFIED for the WEB: David S. Jenkins 2/2009

Download: Guide to Handling Fugitive Dust from Construction Projects.PDF

March 1, 2014

Controlling Fugitive Dust at Construction Sites-Air Quality in Idaho


What is Fugitive Dust?

It’s Air Pollution. Dust is particulate matter (PM) consisting of very small particles. Fugitive dust is PM suspended in the air primarily from soil that has been disturbed by wind or human activities, such as earthmoving and vehicular/equipment traffic on unpaved surfaces.
MORE:
Brochure

Idaho Department of
Environmental Quality
1410 N. Hilton
Boise, ID 83706
(208) 373-0502
www.deq.idaho.gov

Download: Guide to Handling Fugitive Dust from Construction Projects.PDF

June 1, 2012

Fugitive Dust Control for Truck Drivers

Download: Fugitive Dust Control for Truck Drivers

Download: Guide to Handling Fugitive Dust from Construction Projects.PDF

June 10, 2010

Fugitive Dust Control for Truck Drivers





















FUGITIVE DUST CONTROL for TRUCK DRIVERS

  • Wet loads with a fire hose.
  • Ensure adequate freeboard.
  • Cover loads.
  • Reduce speed on unpaved haul roads to less than 15 mph.
  • Stay on gravel haul roads.
  • Stay on paved haul roads.
  • Avoid driving through mud and wet soil.
  • Brush off mud from wheels, wheel wells, running boards and tail gates.
  • Wash wheels and inner fender wells immediately prior to exiting. Use a tire wash if available.
  • Call the truck boss for vacuum sweeper or water truck if you see trackout or visible dust.

FROM: Guide to Handling Fugitive Dust from Construction Projects, AGC of WA Ed. Foundation. 1997
MODIFIED for the WEB: David S. Jenkins, 2/2009

Download: Guide to Handling Fugitive Dust from Construction Projects.PDF

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