Sheetflow Erosion Control Erosion Control for the CESCL

December 4, 2020

Extruded Asphalt Berms

Here are a few examples of extruded asphalt berms or curbs:

Presentation: David Jenkins

This berm keeps clean water from draining off the asphalt to the right into the work area to the left. If the clean water was allowed into the work area, the contractor would have much more dirty water to deal with.

Presentation: David Jenkins

This is another example of using asphalt to keep clean runoff from entering the work area.

Presentation: David Jenkins

In this project, we are removing and replacing the asphalt surface on the left. The asphalt curb is used to keep the dirty runoff on the right from entering the work area. Candlesticks are used to delineate the project boundary and keep vehicles from driving over the berm.

December 3, 2020

Some More Asphalt Berms

Here are some more asphalt berms:

Presentation: David Jenkins

This contractor surrounded an excavation with asphalt berms to direct clean water away from the work and keep dirty water inside the work area. There is a pump behind the sand bags on the right to pump dirty water back into the project. Note the berm that directs street runoff directly to the catch basin.

Presentation: David Jenkins

This contractor has used a hot mix asphalt berm to separate the work area from the roadway to the right. All water and sediment is directed to the pump across the access road which sends the water to a stormwater treatment system.

December 2, 2020

Asphalt Berm

Presentation: David Jenkins

This is a cold patch asphalt berm used to contain high pH water from a concrete crushing operation.

Presentation: David Jenkins

Hot mix asphalt used to contain project water and direct it to a sump and pump. The water was pumped to a header pipe that was connected to a chitosan-enhanced treatment system.

November 26, 2020

Why Perimeter Controls?

Filed under: Power Point — Tags: , , , — Sheetflow @ 1:43 am
Presentation: David Jenkins

Why are perimeter controls necessary? Here are few reasons: keep clean water out of your project and keep dirty water and sediment in your project.

November 25, 2020

Non-Standard Perimeter Controls

Filed under: Power Point — Tags: , , , — Sheetflow @ 1:33 pm
Presentation: David Jenkins

Last month, I did a presentation on non- standard perimeter controls. These are controls other than silt fence, which is the standard perimeter control on construction projects.

While silt fence is the appropriate perimeter control in many situations, (the bottom of a slope), it is inappropriate is so many other situations.

Over the next few weeks, I will post the presentation slides and talk about some of the non-standard controls.

October 21, 2020

Perimeter Controls Presentation

I am giving a presentation on Perimeter Controls: Non-standard Practices for Managing Water and Sediment today at noon. Go to Erosion and Sediment Control Association- British Columbia for information and to sign up. It’s only 10 bucks.

Description-Silt fence is not the only perimeter control BMP option. It is not the best option in many situations. In this presentation, I will discuss when silt fence makes sense, when it doesn’t, what other options are available.

July 6, 2020

Perimeter Control BMPs

Photo: David Jenkins

The contractor is using silt fence and an asphalt berm as perimeter control BMPs. They are containing all sediment and water within the project. When it rains, the contractor pumps stormwater runoff to an on-site treatment system, which uses chitosan-enhanced sand filtration.

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