Sheetflow Erosion Control Erosion Control for the CESCL

January 14, 2020

Where’s the Rock Entrance?

Photo: David Jenkins

Where’s the rock entrance? I am just glad it’s not my project. This is a small staging area for a bike path extension next to a creek. All dirty runoff ends up in the creek. There used to be a rock entrance, but with mud being tracked over it, it has disappeared. With a small staging area and rainy season work next to a creek, I would have specified that the entire staging area be covered with Asphalt Treated Base (ATB), to be removed and recycled at the end of the job. I have done this on several staging areas of up to about two acres. This can end up being much less expensive than managing tire washes and sweepers.

October 30, 2019

Open Catch Basin Fixed Again

photo: David Jenkins

As of two days ago, the open catch basin is fixed again; there is new 30 mil PVC under the catch basin grate and turbid water is not draining into the catch basin. The contractor told their staff not to puncture the PVC. No word on whether they are thinking more proactively about this. The best measure is to keep the stockpile covered and the area cleaned up. We shall see what’s next.

March 1, 2019

Prevent Sediment Trackout

Managing Construction Projects to Prevent Sediment Trackout – I originally submitted this abstract for the 2019 IECA Denver conference . It was not accepted as a presentation but as an article in the October 2018 edition “Environmental Connection Magazine”.

Abstract
Sediment tracking from construction sites onto public roads and highways is a continual source or frustration for both regulators and contractors. The standard best management practices (BMPs) available, such as stabilized construction entrances and sweepers, often don’t work at all and, at best, only reduce total sediment by 30-50% which is inadequate for preventing water quality violations. In addition to water quality problems, sediment tracking onto roadways can generate dust, which may violate clean air standards and cause unsafe conditions, especially on highways.
This paper will discuss BMPs, methods, and procedures, which can be used by contractors to prevent sediment from being tracked onto roadways in the first place. In addition, ways to significantly reduce sediment loss will be presented. Some of these methods include:

• Passive tire baths
• Various tire washes
• Keeping vehicles of dirt
• Vacuum vs. mechanical sweepers
• Road washing
• Contract specifications

Each method will be discussed with pros and cons, design information and contract specifications.

The full magazine can be found at:
Environmental Connection, October/November 2018, Volume 13, Issue 4.

The article is attached below:

February 16, 2019

Vacuum Sweeper Maintenance

Vacuum Sweeper Maintenance – If I specify a vacuum sweeper on a construction project, I expect it to be operational.

I require all systems to be functional per manufacturers specifications.

If not, the sweeper goes away, maybe the job is shut down, until a working sweeper is brought to the site.

Specifications:
1) Power brooms shall not be utilized without prior approval by
the Engineer.

2) Contractor shall have sufficient working vacuum sweepers on
site at all times work is being performed.

3) All sweepers shall have on-board water spray systems that
shall be operating at all times.

4) systems shall function per manufacturer specifications
including, but not limited to, spray water systems, blowers,
vacuum nozzles, hoses, debris hopper, hydraulics and
electrical.

5) At no time shall debris hopper seals leak debris and liquids.

February 2, 2019

Power Brooms

Why Power Brooms are a Bad Idea – As you can see, these types of sweepers don’t pick up dirt and sediment from asphalt, they just spread it around.

Water spray system attachments help some but then the sweeper mostly turns the dirt to mud and smears it around.

These are useful for picking up gravel and sand.

A vacuum sweeper is the way to go.

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