Sheetflow Erosion Control Erosion Control for the CESCL

October 2, 2020

Excellent Tire Wash

Photo: Troy Modie-Port of Seattle

This here is an excellent tire wash. Why? Because it is long enough for two tire rotations. In addition, quarry spalls are installed at the entrance and exit of the tire wash. To the left of the tire wash, the contractor placed quarry spalls so vehicles entering the project don’t have to drive through the tire wash.

May 1, 2020

Tire Wash Fail

Photo: David Jenkins

The photo is taken right at the paved road access to this project. It makes no sense to me why this tire wash is so far back into the site. The fact that the rock exit is so poorly installed and maintained makes it completely ineffective at preventing sediment trackout. i call this a tire wash fail.

February 26, 2020

Construction Entrance Fail

Construction Entrance Fail Photo: IG:freudianswppps

Another construction entrance fail. Vehicles drive through the Soaker tire wash, over some rock, then over dirt and sand, defeating the purpose of the tire wash. This exit from the tire wash needs to be rock or asphalt to the street. Disclaimer: I do not promote any products or suppliers.

January 14, 2020

Where’s the Rock Entrance?

Photo: David Jenkins

Where’s the rock entrance? I am just glad it’s not my project. This is a small staging area for a bike path extension next to a creek. All dirty runoff ends up in the creek. There used to be a rock entrance, but with mud being tracked over it, it has disappeared. With a small staging area and rainy season work next to a creek, I would have specified that the entire staging area be covered with Asphalt Treated Base (ATB), to be removed and recycled at the end of the job. I have done this on several staging areas of up to about two acres. This can end up being much less expensive than managing tire washes and sweepers.

October 6, 2019

Construction Entrance Fail

Photo: David Jenkins

This is a 30 + acre site with one access point, this one. If this was my project, I would have specified a tire wash with an asphalt exit to the street. The tire wash would have been long enough for two tire rotations, have high pressure, low volume nozzles located such that all tire surfaces were sprayed. This system would also have an on-board, treatment polymer injection system to keep the tire wash water relatively clean. I would have specified that the water be tested for turbidity daily, measured at 50 NTUs or less. Since the water is classified as “process water”, I would have required it to be tested for metals and other contaminants, then hauled to an appropriate disposal facility.

August 20, 2019

Truck Being Loaded on Asphalt Keeps Tires Clean

If I’ve said it once, I must have said it 3 or 4 times: “Keep your tires clean!”. Who wants to use a tire wash and have to get rid of a whole lot of dirty water (process water) that can’t go down the storm drain? Save yourself some hassle and money. Give your employees a raise with the money you save.  Make sure your trucks are loaded when on asphalt.

 

Video: David Jenkins

August 13, 2019

Soaker Tire Wash

These are great as long as the tires are not too muddy, the mud is not too sticky and the vehicle load is not too high. Most of the water is directed to the sidewalls and misses much of the mud hiding in the treads. These work great as the final , clean rinse cycle in conjunction with a tire bath best management practice. Chemical flocculants can be added to the water to remove much of the sediment load. Web site: www.sheetflow.com

Description from the website: http://www.thesoaker.com/

“The Soaker” is a portable, self-contained and environmentally friendly wheel washing system. The system does not require city power or water connected to it which makes it highly portable.

“The Soaker” can be installed on job sites, dump sites and material pits to help keep the surrounding streets free of mud and dirt.

Its aluminum and stainless steel construction makes “The Soaker” environmentally friendly.

It features a high capacity main tank of 4000 gallons and a reserve tank of 2000 gallons. Its adjustable spray heads provide a low pressure/high volume water stream of up to 1000gpm. Motion sensors detect the vehicles on approach and turn on the pumps so the water spray is at full power by the time the vehicles go through the wheel wash.

“The Soaker” is manufactured to provide solutions to problems such as portability, road pollution, costly cleaning processes, fines and violations for depositing debris onto public highways, etc…

“The Soaker” can be rented on a monthly basis or purchased. A lease purchase option is also available. For more information about “The Soaker” wheel washing system, please call us at: (818) 952-6752 or email at: soakerinfo@thesoaker.com

March 1, 2019

Prevent Sediment Trackout

Managing Construction Projects to Prevent Sediment Trackout – I originally submitted this abstract for the 2019 IECA Denver conference . It was not accepted as a presentation but as an article in the October 2018 edition “Environmental Connection Magazine”.

Abstract
Sediment tracking from construction sites onto public roads and highways is a continual source or frustration for both regulators and contractors. The standard best management practices (BMPs) available, such as stabilized construction entrances and sweepers, often don’t work at all and, at best, only reduce total sediment by 30-50% which is inadequate for preventing water quality violations. In addition to water quality problems, sediment tracking onto roadways can generate dust, which may violate clean air standards and cause unsafe conditions, especially on highways.
This paper will discuss BMPs, methods, and procedures, which can be used by contractors to prevent sediment from being tracked onto roadways in the first place. In addition, ways to significantly reduce sediment loss will be presented. Some of these methods include:

• Passive tire baths
• Various tire washes
• Keeping vehicles of dirt
• Vacuum vs. mechanical sweepers
• Road washing
• Contract specifications

Each method will be discussed with pros and cons, design information and contract specifications.

The full magazine can be found at:
Environmental Connection, October/November 2018, Volume 13, Issue 4.

The article is attached below:

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