Sheetflow Construction Erosion and Sediment Control

March 19, 2019

Inspecting Sand Bag Check Dams

How to inspect sand bag check dams.

March 12, 2019

Storm Clouds Over Kanab, Utah

Filed under: Photo — Tags: , , , , — Sheetflow @ 1:32 am

Storm Clouds Over Kanab, Utah

David Jenkins-One Click Off Photography

March 8, 2019

Curb Inlet Protection

According to the Minnesota Stormwater Manual:

“Inlet protection devices intercept and/or filter sediment before it can be transported from a site into the storm drain system and discharged into a lake, river, stream, wetland, or other waterbody.

These devices also keep sediment from filling or clogging storm drain pipes, ditches, and downgradient sediment traps or ponds.

Inlet protection may also include placement of a barrier to create a bypass of an inlet transferring flow downstream to a sediment trap, basin, or other inlet discharging to a non-critical area.”

Nothing wrong with sediment control BMPs, as they are necessary tools in an effective erosion and sediment control system.  However, these do not “filter” sediment. 

When properly installed, these allow for ponding of water which allows larger sediment to settle out, keeping it out of the storm system.  This is a good thing, but doesn’t necessarily prevent water quality non-compliance.   

I do like this statement in the manual : “Caution: To the extent feasible, erosion prevention practices such as stabilization are preferred to sediment control practices.”

In my world, where we have to meet a turbidity effluent limit of 25 NTUs, stabilization and stormwater management are the primary methods used to meet strict turbidity limits.  

March 1, 2019

Managing Construction Projects to Prevent Sediment Trackout

I originally submitted this abstract for the 2019 IECA Denver conference . It was not accepted as a presentation but as an article in the October 2018 edition “Environmental Connection Magazine”.

Abstract
Sediment tracking from construction sites onto public roads and highways is a continual source or frustration for both regulators and contractors. The standard best management practices (BMPs) available, such as stabilized construction entrances and sweepers, often don’t work at all and, at best, only reduce total sediment by 30-50% which is inadequate for preventing water quality violations. In addition to water quality problems, sediment tracking onto roadways can generate dust, which may violate clean air standards and cause unsafe conditions, especially on highways.
This paper will discuss BMPs, methods, and procedures, which can be used by contractors to prevent sediment from being tracked onto roadways in the first place. In addition, ways to significantly reduce sediment loss will be presented. Some of these methods include:

• Passive tire baths
• Various tire washes
• Keeping vehicles of dirt
• Vacuum vs. mechanical sweepers
• Road washing
• Contract specifications

Each method will be discussed with pros and cons, design information and contract specifications.

The full magazine can be found at:
Environmental Connection, October/November 2018, Volume 13, Issue 4.

The article is attached below.

February 23, 2019

More Clean Water Diversion Best Management Practices

This shows several simple water diversion berms in action during a heavy rain. While the construction project is complete and the grass has grown, you can see how they prevented erosion during the project when bare dirt was exposed to rain.

February 16, 2019

Vacuum Sweeper Maintenance

If I specify a vacuum sweeper on a construction project, I expect it to be operational.

I require all systems to be functional per manufacturers specifications.

If not, the sweeper goes away, maybe the job is shut down, until a working sweeper is brought to the site.

Specifications:
1) Power brooms shall not be utilized without prior approval by
the Engineer.

2) Contractor shall have sufficient working vacuum sweepers on
site at all times work is being performed.

3) All sweepers shall have on-board water spray systems that
shall be operating at all times.

4) systems shall function per manufacturer specifications
including, but not limited to, spray water systems, blowers,
vacuum nozzles, hoses, debris hopper, hydraulics and
electrical.

5) At no time shall debris hopper seals leak debris and liquids.

February 9, 2019

Utah Rain-Springtime

Filed under: Video — Tags: , , , — Sheetflow @ 12:04 am

Southbound on Highway 89 in April. No erosion, just a beautiful spring day.

February 2, 2019

Why Power Brooms are a Bad Idea

Filed under: Video — Tags: , , , , , , — Sheetflow @ 10:13 am

As you can see, these types of sweepers don’t pick up dirt and sediment from asphalt, they just spread it around.

Water spray system attachments help some but then the sweeper mostly turns the dirt to mud and smears it around.

These are useful for picking up gravel and sand.

A vacuum sweeper is the way to go.

January 14, 2019

Bonded Fiber Matrix BFM Needs to Cure Before it Rains

Bonded fiber matrix (BFM) needs to dry for 24 to 36 hours before it rains or else it can start to wash off.

December 2, 2018

Construction Erosion Inspection Hog Fuel Mulch Prevents Fugitive Dust

You are hauling dirt on a dry day and the dust is flying.
The water truck driver’s head is about to explode trying to keep up with the dust control.
Save yourself a Labor and Industries claim!
Use ground up vegetation (hog fuel)! Don’t haul it to the landfill.

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