Sheetflow Construction Erosion and Sediment Control

December 10, 2019

Creative Contractor Makes Slope Tracking Excavator Bucket

Filed under: Video — Sheetflow @ 7:07 am

Leave it to the contractor to come up with creative solutions. Confronted with a small, steep slope and wet soil, the contractor didn’t want to risk walking a small caterpiller up and down to roughen it before hydroseeding. Using some angle iron and an excavator bucket, they welded up a slope tracker. The operator tamps the slope with the bucket just like they are compacting the slope. This is the result.

December 3, 2019

Construction Erosion Inspection-Trench Excavation Asphalt Kept Clean

Dirt loaded into front loader bucket and hauled to stockpile, or dirt side cast onto asphalt: which is cheaper? How about no sweeper needed, no dirty water going down the drain. I go with the first answer.

November 26, 2019

Track Walking Slopes Reduces Erosion

Filed under: Video — Sheetflow @ 7:46 am

Want a simple and effective way to reduce slope erosion by up to 50%? Don’t back blade your slopes, track walk them!

November 19, 2019

Rain on Roughened Slope Causes Slump of Eroded Mud into Ditch

Filed under: Video — Sheetflow @ 7:13 am

This video shows the effect of a little rain on a “tracked” slope that has a high percentage of silt.

November 12, 2019

Hydroseeding on Blanket Instead of Under Not the Best

Filed under: Video — Tags: , , , , , , , , — Sheetflow @ 7:18 am

This is not the best way to get grass growing. The seed sits on the blanket which is a quarter to half inch above the soil. Since the seed needs to be in contact with the soil to have the best chance of growing, this will reduce the quantity of grass that grows. In a ditch, the more grass the better. The best way is to hydroseed first and then install the blanket.

November 6, 2019

Sometimes There’s Just Too Much Rain

Filed under: Photo — Tags: , , , , , , , — Sheetflow @ 1:08 pm
November 6, 2006 Sea-Tac, Washington Photo: David Jenkins

We were building a new runway, had several hundred acres of open ground, when the big rains came. We were using the stormwater ponds to collect all of the water for a 10 year 24 hour storm event, or 3 inches of rain. All of the water in the ponds was being treated with chitosan-enhanced sand filtration systems before discharge.

The storm of November 6, 2006 was something over the 50 year 24 hour event and something under the 100 year 24 hour event. With the rainfall and the pond over topping, water was discovered draining from the base of the pond. Rock and ecoblocks were placed as an emergency fix to keep the pond from a catastrophic failure. All of the dirty water drained to a creek, but, nothing we could do.

November 5, 2019

Inspecting Sand Bag Check Dams

How to inspect sand bag check dams.

November 4, 2019

ESCA-BC 2019 Conference

I will be at the ESCA-BC 2019 Conference this week up in Coquitlam, British Columbia. I am giving two presentations and a workshop. This is a list of all of the Sessions.

I will be doing the following sessions:

Workshop

Writing Contract Specifications to Achieve Environmental Compliance Workshop

Presentations

Writing Contract Specifications to Achieve Environmental Compliance Presentation

Why Projects Fail to Meet Water Quality Requirements Presentation

October 31, 2019

Is This Silt Fence Necessary?

Filed under: Photo — Tags: , , , , , , , , , — Sheetflow @ 1:24 am
Perimeter Silt Fence Photo: David Jenkins

Overlooking the fact that this silt fence installation needs some maintenance, I wonder if it was ever really needed in this location? The slope grades to the fence are minimal and not very long, and the roadside ditch line is graded so that water will drain away from the road.

This type of silt fence installation is appropriate at the base of long, steep slopes, or if there is risk of sediment travelling off site. Also, all of the materials used will likely be land filled and not reused, including the wire backing and the “T” posts.

If this were my site, I would have installed orange safety fence with steel “T” posts, maybe with a compost berm along the base, on the project side. The safety fence can be easily removed and reused later, and the compost could be raked into the ditch line and hydroseeded.

October 30, 2019

Open Catch Basin Fixed Again

Filed under: Photo — Tags: , , , , , — Sheetflow @ 4:59 am
Back where we started, 30 mil PVC blocking the catch basin. Photo: David Jenkins

As of two days ago, there is new 30 mil PVC under the catch basin grate and turbid water is not draining into the catch basin. The contractor told their staff not to puncture the PVC. No word on whether they are thinking more proactively about this. The best measure is to keep the stockpile covered and the area cleaned up. We shall see what’s next.

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