Sheetflow Erosion Control Erosion Control for CESCL's

September 24, 2020

Biodegradable Erosion Control BMPs: Burlap Fence Compost Sock

Video: David Jenkins

Biodegradable Erosion Control BMPs: Burlap Fence Compost Sock

My goal was 100% biodegradable BMPs on this habitat restoration project. In this video I show the burlap silt fence and the compost socks.

September 21, 2020

Steel Plate Construction Access

Video: David Jenkins

This is a steel plate construction access that we built across a live stormwater swale. We have installed compost socks along the edge to keep construction runoff out of the swale.

September 17, 2020

Compost Sock Catch Basin Berm

Photo: David Jenkins

This compost sock catch basin berm works well as it is heavy enough to stick to the asphalt. Note the tear and I would keep an eye on it during inspections.

September 16, 2020

30 mil PVC

Photo: David Jenkins

Catch Basin Covered with 30 mil PVC – This catch basin in a live storm system sits right in the middle of an actively worked area. Plugging the discharge pipe wasn’t possible due to depth and access of the manhole. The solution is placing heavy 30 mil PVC liner material under the grate then telling all of the workers that they are not to poke holes in it when the area floods from rain.

September 15, 2020

Stockpile Cover and Berm

photo: David Jenkins

For this stockpile cover and berm application, I think the contractor could have used a few more sand bags.

September 10, 2020

EXCAVATOR EATS BUILDING!

Filed under: Photo — Tags: , , , , , — Sheetflow @ 3:41 am
Excavator Eats Building. Photo: David Jenkins

Excavator Eats Building! I need to throw in an art shot now and then or this TESC stuff gets old.

September 9, 2020

Berm for Quarry Spalls

Quarry Spalls. Photo: David Jenkins

This would not have been my choice as a berm for quarry spalls; straw wattles are too light to use on asphalt and they allow water to flow under them. A compost sock, being heavy, would work better, though, they are prone to tearing. An asphalt berm might be best here.

September 8, 2020

Biodegradable Wattles

I wrote this biodegradable wattles specification for a riverbank habitat restoration project.

I wrote the last three sentences for this particular project, which has a 2:1 slope above an intertidal river. We will place 12 inches of compost before installing native plants this winter; without the wattles, wet compost will slide to the base of the slope.

BIODEGRADABLE WATTLES

  1. Wattles shall consist of 100% biodegradable straw, coir, excelsior or compost encased in 100% biodegradable fabric or mesh.
  2.  Wattles shall be a minimum of 8 inches in diameter free of cuts tears and damage.
  3. The installation of straw wattles shall be per WSDOT Standard Plan I-30.30-00 “Wattle Installation on Slope”.
  4. Wattles shall be staked in place using wooden stakes a minimum of 16 inches long.  The stakes shall be cut flush with the top of the wattles.
  5. Wattles shall be installed on the Site 25 slope above +12 elevation.
  6. Wattles shall be installed in two rows across the slope parallel to the 12 + elevation. 
  7. Rows shall be approximately 7 feet above the +12 elevation and 7 feet below the top of the slope.

September 7, 2020

Trash Bag Catch Basin Cover

Photo: David Jenkins

In an emergency, a heavy duty trash bag can provide catch basin protection until a more permanent BMP is installed.

September 3, 2020

Source of the Foam-Dewatering

Photo: David Jenkins

The contractor has to dewater to dig an excavation for an electrical duct bank-the water table is high. The soil is mildly contaminated so all of the water has to be treated in a Chitosan-enhanced Sand Filtration (CESF) system with granular activated carbon (GAC) before discharge to the waterway. The contractor set the well points, hooked them up to the pump but not the CESF system. So, water went directly onto the ground from the pump and into the nearest catch basin. The foam is from the silt in the soil that has been aerated by the pump.

Older Posts »

Powered by WordPress