Sheetflow Construction Erosion and Sediment Control

October 21, 2019

“Means and Methods” vs. Best Management Practices

Demolition of landside crane rail on a shipping container terminal.

In my experience, managing contractor “means and methods” is more important than using the “right” best management practices. When turbidity is the standard for measuring water quality compliance, as in Washington state, site cleanliness is the key to prevention and compliance.

This contract requires that catch basin inserts be installed in all catch basins within the project boundaries. However, inserts are not at all effective in reducing turbidity in runoff. While removing the crane rail on this container terminal project, the contractor could clean up as the work progresses, place all material removed from the trench onto plastic for later removal, load into a Bobcat bucket, and pick up small debris with a shop vac. I can require these things in the contract that the contractor bids. It may cost extra; the extra cost may be worth it if it reduces my risk. If I tell the contractor after the contract is awarded, I will pay more.

I can also make suggestions during the work, pointing out that keeping things really clean will keep them in compliance with their NPDES permit. If framed in a way that shows benefit to the contractor, meaning reducing risk and cost, they will probably follow the suggestion.

June 18, 2019

Fugitive Dust Control Compliance at the Port of Seattle

Download: Fugitive Dust Control Compliance at the Port of Seattle

May 7, 2019

Fugitive Dust Control for Equipment Operators

Download: Fugitive Dust Control for Equipment Operators

Download: Guide to Handling Fugitive Dust from Construction Projects.PDF

April 27, 2013

Airport Embankment Project Tests Erosion Control Options

While building an embankment for a new runway at the Seattle-Tacoma International Airport in Washington, the Port of Seattle is also developing some new erosion control measures to help protect the water quality of nearby creeks and potentially boost compliance with state water-quality standards beyond what is required.

“We want to go the extra mile in keeping sediment on-site and protecting water quality during construction,” maintains David Jenkins, erosion control and stormwater engineer for the port. “We are shooting for a system that will be even better than the prescribed state guidelines and that will fit right in with the way we are building the embankment.”

Read the full article in the Erosion Control Magazine

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