Sheetflow Erosion Control Erosion Control for the CESCL

October 27, 2020

Dusty Spalls

Video: David Jenkins-Sheetflow Erosion Control

Dusty Spalls-sounds like the name of a cowboy in an old “B” western film. These quarry spalls came with enough crushed rock dust to create a fugitive dust cloud when dropped into a “skip” box.

September 9, 2020

Berm for Quarry Spalls

Quarry Spalls. Photo: David Jenkins

This would not have been my choice as a berm for quarry spalls; straw wattles are too light to use on asphalt and they allow water to flow under them. A compost sock, being heavy, would work better, though, they are prone to tearing. An asphalt berm might be best here.

October 2, 2020

Excellent Tire Wash

Photo: Troy Modie-Port of Seattle

This here is an excellent tire wash. Why? Because it is long enough for two tire rotations. In addition, quarry spalls are installed at the entrance and exit of the tire wash. To the left of the tire wash, the contractor placed quarry spalls so vehicles entering the project don’t have to drive through the tire wash.

September 27, 2020

Erosion Control Photos

Filed under: — Sheetflow @ 3:49 pm

All photos may be used for teaching and training purposes with attribution to: David Jenkins, sheetflow.com

Photos may not be used for commercial purposes without prior express permission from David Jenkins, sheetflow.com

June 16, 2016

Paying for TESC

The Best Way to Measure and Pay for TESC in Public Works Contracts

It is a big mistake to make temporary erosion and sediment an “incidental” item in a public works contract. Anything that can be measured should be and set up as a Unit Price item. Planning and Implementation can be lump sum but measurement and payment must be clearly specified. Force Account is set up for unforeseen conditions; the amount is set by the owner so that everyone bids the same number. Make clear at the pre-bid meeting that the Lump Sum bid for planning and implementation covers lots of stuff and they need to bid accordingly. Here is an example of the best way to pay: (more…)

June 25, 2015

Low Impact Construction

Low Impact Development for Public Works Construction:
Erosion and Sediment Control Compliance

David S. Jenkins, Seattle, Washington

Introduction
Construction is a messy business; in the Puget Sound region of western Washington, with average annual rainfall of 40″ to 60″, it can also be challenging. Uncontrolled erosion from a construction site can generate 10-1000 times the quantity of sediment that occurs naturally from vegetated areas. Most construction in western Washington occurs near wetlands, streams, lakes, or the Puget Sound where sediment loss can reduce beneficial uses, or worse, destroy a salmon stream.

This paper will discuss proven methods that public works professionals can utilise to improve erosion control compliance and reduce project impacts.
(more…)

Powered by WordPress