Sheetflow Erosion Control Erosion Control for the CESCL

December 4, 2020

Extruded Asphalt Berms

Here are a few examples of extruded asphalt berms or curbs:

Presentation: David Jenkins

This berm keeps clean water from draining off the asphalt to the right into the work area to the left. If the clean water was allowed into the work area, the contractor would have much more dirty water to deal with.

Presentation: David Jenkins

This is another example of using asphalt to keep clean runoff from entering the work area.

Presentation: David Jenkins

In this project, we are removing and replacing the asphalt surface on the left. The asphalt curb is used to keep the dirty runoff on the right from entering the work area. Candlesticks are used to delineate the project boundary and keep vehicles from driving over the berm.

December 3, 2020

Some More Asphalt Berms

Here are some more asphalt berms:

Presentation: David Jenkins

This contractor surrounded an excavation with asphalt berms to direct clean water away from the work and keep dirty water inside the work area. There is a pump behind the sand bags on the right to pump dirty water back into the project. Note the berm that directs street runoff directly to the catch basin.

Presentation: David Jenkins

This contractor has used a hot mix asphalt berm to separate the work area from the roadway to the right. All water and sediment is directed to the pump across the access road which sends the water to a stormwater treatment system.

December 2, 2020

Asphalt Berm

Presentation: David Jenkins

This is a cold patch asphalt berm used to contain high pH water from a concrete crushing operation.

Presentation: David Jenkins

Hot mix asphalt used to contain project water and direct it to a sump and pump. The water was pumped to a header pipe that was connected to a chitosan-enhanced treatment system.

April 27, 2020

Cold Mix Asphalt Berm

Photo: David Jenkins

Cold mix asphalt berm works too. Used along the base of “jersey” barriers, high pH water from a concrete breaking operation is contained for later disposal off site.

April 24, 2020

Extruded Asphalt Berm

Photo: David Jenkins

Extruded asphalt berm at project entrance with center section “rolled” to allow trucks to enter and exit.

April 23, 2020

Extruded Asphalt Berm

Photo: David Jenkins

Another example of an extruded asphalt berm used to keep off site water from entering the work area.

April 22, 2020

Extruded Asphalt Berm

Photo: David Jenkins

We use extruded asphalt berms extensively to contain and direct site water to grass infield areas and to keep clean offsite water from entering the project. When the project is completed, the asphalt is removed and hauled to a batch plant for recycle.

April 21, 2020

Hot Mix Asphalt Berm

Photo: David Jenkins

The work area is the left. All runoff is diverted by silt fence and this hot mix asphalt berm to a sump, where it is pumped to a chitosan-enhanced sand filtration treatment system. This system prevented all turbid site water from entering the roadside ditch-outside of the silt fence-from draining to a creek. Note the mud on the left side of the berm and the clean asphalt on the right.

Since this is summer work and perimeter BMPs are containing all site runoff, we are not covering bare soil.

Upon completion and soil stabilization, the asphalt berm will be removed and hauled to an asphalt batch plant for recycle.

April 3, 2020

Eroded Stockpile

Photo: David Jenkins

This eroded stockpile is well within the project boundaries and there is nothing leaving the project. I consider this a problem for the contractor, not for water quality compliance. By allowing this to occur, the contractor has made the eroded stockpile soil unsuitable for use in embankment fill and has to haul it offsite at their expense. This could have been avoided by berming the top of the stockpile to direct water to pipe slope drain pipe that prevents water from flowing over the side of the fill.

April 1, 2020

Compost Berm

Photo: David Jenkins

We rarely use silt fence on smaller airfield projects because: the work areas are nearly flat, are surrounded by grass or pavement, the work takes a few months, usually in the summer or fall. Compost berms are frequently used to: contain water, divert water, prevent site runoff. A secondary benefit is filtration; there is some turbidity reduction. Lastly, when done,. we spread the compost out over the disturbed soil and hydroseed it, enhancing grass growth and eliminating the waste of land-filling silt fence.

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