Sheetflow Erosion Control Erosion Control for the CESCL

October 19, 2020

Windy, Dusty, No Water

Video: David Jenkins-Sheetflow Erosion Control

It’s windy, dusty and there is no water. Wait! Hey man, there is a hydrant right there. Use it, spray the dirt, keep the dust down!

October 16, 2020

Boulder Fence Silt Fence

Photo: David Jenkins-Sheetflow Erosion Control

I like boulder fence but I hate silt fence. I hate that it is plastic and not recyclable and that it ends up in the land fill. However, it is very strong and in this instance it is the right BMP.

September 29, 2020

Sod Berm Perimeter BMP

Photo: David Jenkins

This is not one of my projects but we have used this method on occasion. Why install silt fence when you can create a sod berm perimeter BMP?

In this case, the area is small and it is surrounded by vegetation so the risk of erosion and turbid runoff is low. In addition, the sod is full roots and seeds so it will regrow in place, providing additional erosion prevention.

September 25, 2020

Gravel Berm

Photo: David Jenkins

When we rebuilt this road, we had the contractor blade the gravel base course into a berm along the edge. This created a berm to project the bare area on the left from erosion caused by runoff from the roadway.

The gravel berm was bladed smooth just before installing a curb along the edge of the road. The bare soil was hydroseeded with bonded fiber matrix.

By using the gravel in this way, we avoided installing silt fence, preventing the soil disturbance that causes and keeping a bunch of plastic out of the landfill at the end of the project.

August 18, 2020

Silt Fence, Covered Stockpile

I saw this driving by a new apartment building project.  Everything is so tidy.   They attached the silt fence to the cyclone fence and  secured the black plastic from damaging wind.
Photo: David Jenkins

I saw this driving by a new apartment building project. Everything is so tidy. They attached the silt fence to the cyclone fence and secured the black plastic stockpile cover from damaging wind.

July 8, 2020

BMP Graveyard-Silt Fence

Photo: David Jenkins

BMP graveyard-silt fence: 10 year old silt fence-does this stuff ever go away?

July 6, 2020

Perimeter Control BMPs

Photo: David Jenkins

The contractor is using silt fence and an asphalt berm as perimeter control BMPs. They are containing all sediment and water within the project. When it rains, the contractor pumps stormwater runoff to an on-site treatment system, which uses chitosan-enhanced sand filtration.

June 24, 2020

Silt Fence and Trackout Fail Part 2

This is a follow up to Silt Fence and Trackout Fail post from April 6, 2020. Same old !@#$, different month.

Photo: David Jenkins
Photo: David Jenkins

June 17, 2020

Silt Fence Overlap

Photo: David Jenkins
Photo: David Jenkins

This is one option for splicing two pieces of silt fence together. Fortunately, this is a low risk application around a short term Groco compost stockpile.

June 11, 2020

Phasing a Stockpile Project to Prevent Dirty Runoff From Draining to Wetlands

Image: David Jenkins

Phasing a Stockpile Project

Phase 1-

(A) Install silt fences on perimeter and at base of future stockpile.

(B) Clear, grub, grade, construct drainage ditches and temporary stormwater pond including outlet structure and perforated pipe level spreader drains. Grade to drain water away from outer perimeter silt fence and toward ditch.

(C) Hydroseed and install blankets in ditch line.

(D) NOTE: Background stockpile, built later, used an early generation construction stormwater treatment system and discharged to creek instead of level spreaders into vegetation.

Phase 2-

(A) Place and compact fill material to approximately 20 feet of vertical elevation.

(B) Trackwalk and hydroseed slope.

Phase 3-

(A) Same as Phase 2.

(B) Same as Phase 2.

Phase 4-

(A) Place and compact fill material to approximately 20 feet of vertical elevation. Start base of slope 15 feet in from lower fill and grade to drain away from lower slope and to the stormwater pond.

(B) Trackwalk and hydroseed slope.

(C) No hydroseed on top of the pile as material is continually brought in as available.

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